Research Publications

A. A. Ibiene

  1. Author:  G. C. Okpokwasili AND A. A. Ibiene

Title: Enhancement of recovery of residual oil using a biosurfactant slug - African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 5 (5), pp. 453-456, 1 March 2006

Link: http://search.proquest.com/openview/a15ed156f962284074c9e1943f1dbc5f/1?pq-origsite=gscholar

Abstract: A laboratory investigation of the mobilization and displacement of residual oil in a sand-pack using

biosurfactant slug was conducted. The biosurfactant employed was extracted from a culture of Pseudomonas sp. grown on kerosine- supplemented mineral salts medium. Characterization of the biosurfactant extract revealed a mixture of glycolipid and phospholipid in a ratio of 3.35:1. The irreducible water saturation (Swi) and initial residual oil saturation (Sor) of the sand-pack were 0.280 ± 0.003 and 0.373 ± 0.006, respectively. Core flooding experiment showed that an optimum oil recovery of 52.19% of the in-place residual oil was achieved at biosurfactant incubation time (BIT) of 120 h. These results suggest that biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas species is a potential “candidate” for microbially enhanced oil recovery.

 

Keywords: Laboratory investigation, enhanced oil recovery, biosurfactant slug, Pseudomonas species.

 

  1. Author:  Ibiene AA, Agogbua JU, Okonko IO and Nwachi GN

Title: Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) as biofertilizer: Effect on growth of Lycopersicum esculentus - Journal of American Science, 2012; 8(2);

Link: www.jofamericanscience.org/journals/am-sci/am0802/045_7632am0802_318_324.pdf

Abstract: Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are bacteria that colonize plant roots and encourage plant growth by a wide variety of mechanisms such as phosphate solubilization, phytohormone production, antifungal activity, etc. In this present study, effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on Lycoperscium esculentus was examined. Azotobacter species, Nitrobacter species, and Nitrosomonas species were isolated and identified using standard methods. In-vitro screening of these PGPR was carried out to test their ability to produce phytohormones (siderophore, phosphate solubilization and indole acetic acid). Seed germination and seedling growth test were also conducted to evaluate the effect of PGPR on the germination of tomato seeds. The growth parameters (plant height, stem width, root length and the internode length of the plant) were monitored at 5 DAP (days after planting) interval from the day of sprouting. The findings of the study showed that the ability to solubilize phosphate was exhibited by Nitrobacter species and Nitrosomonas species while Azotobacter species produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderphore. It also showed that the consortium of the three isolates gave the best performance in terms of growth parameters (plant height = 15.8 cm, stem width = 1.0 cm, root length = 10.0 cm and the internode length = 3.8 cm) than the control (plant height = 11.0 cm, stem width = 0.5 cm, root length = 6.1 cm and the internode length = 2.5 cm) . Thus, the use of combined biofertilizers is advocated for excellent growth performance of plants.

 

Keywords: Azotobacter species, Nitrobacter species, Nitrosomonas species, siderophore, phosphate solubilization, indole acetic acid, DAP, PGPR

  1. Author:  Orji, F.A., A.A. Ibiene and O.C. Ugbogu

 

Title: Petroleum Hydrocarbon Pollution of Mangrove Swamps: The Promises of Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation - American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 (2): 207-216, 2012

Link: https://www.google.com.ng/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjx3uuXyu3NAhVlDsAKHVBDDz8QFggdMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fthescipub.com%2FPDF%2Fajabssp.2012.207.216.pdf&usg=AFQjCNF_VZRDwnLAgH2xUJ4Qzj3MMSNXeQ&bvm=bv.126130881,d.ZGg 

Abstract: The Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA) is currently being used as a cleanup technology in polluted environments in the Niger Delta and other parts of the globe. The effectiveness of RENA as a remediation technology in the most recent time has been challenged by few authorities. The deleterious effects of pollutants on the environment have led to increased awareness and vigilance against contamination of the Niger Delta environment. Bio remediation which has been defined as biological response to environmental abuse has continued to receive research attentions across the globe. This study addresses issues against the RENA and recommended ways forward. Approach: The review paper studied published articles and Oil companies routine practices of managing petroleum hydrocarbon polluted Environments including mangrove swamps from 1970 till date. The Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA) is currently being used as a cleanup technology in polluted environments in the Niger Delta including mangrove ecosystems. Results: The study made inputs on the controversial issues around RENA technology and recommended certain ways forward. This revision also reported the ways of managing the concerns raised against RENA. Conclusion/Recommendations: Oil firms, remediation contractors and consultants using this RENA approach should employ strict monitoring during the process and also adhere strictly to standard practices and the mitigation measures for all the cases against RENA as documented in this review study. This is to ensure the achievement of Sustainable Development.

 

Keywords: Remediation by Enhanced Natural Attenuation (RENA), Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC), Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH), Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB)

 

  1. Author:  Frank Anayo Orji, Abiye Anthony Ibiene and Phillip O. Okerentugba

 

Title: BIOREMEDIATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-POLLUTED MANGROVE SWAMPS USING NUTRIENT FORMULA PRODUCED FROM WATER HYACINT (EICCHORNIA CRASSIPES) - American Journal of Environmental Science 9 (4): 348-366, 2013

Link: https://www.google.com.ng/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiLvdi2y-3NAhUsCMAKHVncAPQQFggcMAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fthescipub.com%2FPDF%2Fajessp.2013.348.366.pdf&usg=AFQjCNHFrGspou4gBLCsmHSzt0MWL8yyaQ&bvm=bv.126130881,d.ZGg

Abstract: Laboratory-scale studies were carried out using a nutrient formula produced from Eicchornia crassipes plant to achieve bioremediation of crude oil impacted mangrove soil. In a 70 day study, the culturable heterotrophic bacterial population of the Eichhornia crassipes recipe increased from 6.26´105 Cfu/g to 2.69´107 Cfu/g. The control set-up had its total culturable bacterial count increased from 5.76´105 Cfu/g to

1.24´106 Cfu/g. Statistical analyses showed significant difference for the two conditions (p ³ 0.05). The total culturable heterotrophic fungal count in the Eichhornia crassipes recipe treatment increased from 5.36´105 Cfu/g to 2.50´107 Cfu/g respectively. The total culturable hydrocarbon utilising bacteria in Eichhornia crassipes treated polluted mangrove soil increased from 2.52´104 Cfu/g to 3.81´107 Cfu/g. Statistical analyses showed significant difference at p ≥ 0.05 level for the two conditions (Eicchornia crassipes nutrient treated soil and control). The total culturable hydrocarbon utilising fungal counts increased significantly for both the control and Eichhornia crassipes treatment. There was no regular trend in pH changes in all the conditions. The conductivity value of the Eichhornia crassipes recipe treated soil decreased progressively. Phosphate, nitrate, %total organic carbon, Total Hydrocarbon Content (THC). Studies using Gas chromatographic analyses showed that in the Eichhornia crassipes recipe treated polluted mangrove soil, 0, 58.92 and 75.36% were lost at zero hour, 28th day and 70th day respectively. In addition, in the control experimental set-up, 0, 7.14 and 13.42% of TPH were lost at zero hour, 28th day and 70th day respectively. There was no significant difference between the control experiment and Eichhornia crassipes (p = 0.054). The use of organic nutrient sources such Eichhornia crassipes recipe/nutrient powder is of good use as source of limiting nutrient needed for bioremediation of crude oil impacted medium.

 

Keywords: Bioremediation, Nutrient Formula/Powder From Water Hyacinth, Petroleum Hydrocarbon

Pollution, Biotechnology, Mangrove Swamps, Niger Delta

 

  1. Author:  Ibiene AA and Okpokwasili GSC

Title: COMPARATIVE TOXICITIES OF THREE AGRO-INSECTICIDE FORMULATIONS ON NITRIFYING BACTERIA - Report and Opinion, 2011; 3:(12)

Link: www.sciencepub.net/report/report0312/003_7633report0312_14_17.pdf

Abstract: The toxicity of three agro-insecticides - Lindane, Diazinon and Carbofuran formulations- on Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas sp. were investigated. Changes in populations and activities of bacteria isolated from soil samples in the Niger Delta area were monitored following their exposure to different concentrations of the agro-insecticides for four hours. Results of toxicity studies revealed that the median lethal (LC50) and effective (EC50) concentrations of both Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas sp. generally decreased with increase in exposure time. The LC50 of the three insecticide formulations for both Nitrobacter and Nitrosomonas sp. decreased thus: Carbofuran > Diazinon > Lindane (p<0.05). Four- hour LC50 of 417.00, 478.70, 1085.40 mg/l (Nitrobacter sp.) and 290.20, 259.00, 1018.30 mg/l (Nitrosomonas sp.) were obtained for Lindane, Diazinon and Carbofuran, respectively. However, the EC50 of the three insecticide formulations for both bacteria were not significantly different (p> 0.05). Four- hour EC50 of 53.31, 55.28, 66.00 mg/l (Nitrobacter sp.) and 59.31, 37.59, 51.34 mg/l (Nitrosomonas sp.) were obtained for Lindane, Diazinon and Carbofuran, respectively. The study also revealed that Nitrosomonas sp. was more sensitive to Lindane and Diazinon than Nitrobacter sp. although both bacteria exhibited similar sensitivity Carbofuran. The results suggest that autotrophic transformation by nitrifying bacteria in soil may be hindered following contaminations with these agro-insecticide formulations.

Keywords: Lindane, Diazinon, Carbofuran, Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Toxicity.

 

  1. Author:  Njoku, O. E., Agwa, O. K., Ibiene, A. A.

Title: An investigation of the microbiological and physicochemical profile of some fish pond water within the Niger Delta region of Nigeria - Vol.9 (3), pp. 155-162 , March 2015

Link: http://www.academicjournals.org/journal/AJFS/article-full-text/6AE015850840

Abstract: The microbial profile of some concrete and earthen fish ponds within the Niger delta region was evaluated. The results of physico-chemical properties of the water samples showed that alkalinity values were significantly higher in concrete ponds (99.7±47.1 to 150±69.7) than (18±6.9 to 24±14.5 mg/L) in earthen ponds. Electrical conductivity values varied significantly between the ponds with (200±84.1 to 290±74.9 µs/m) in concrete ponds and (18±6.9 to 24±14.5 µs/m) in earthen ponds. Sulphate concentrations were higher in concrete ponds (0.25±0.36 to 1.53±14.9 mg/L) than (0.25±0.36 to 0.4±0.77 mg/L) in earthen ponds. The mean total heterotrophic bacteria count was higher in concrete ponds (6.5×105 to 7.4×105 cfu/ml) than in earthen (6.3×105 to 6.5x105 cfu/ml) ponds. The mean fungal count ranged from 2.11×105 to 2.25×105 cfu/ml in concrete pond and (1.8×105 to 2.4×105 cfu/ml) in earthen ponds. The bacterial genera isolated from the ponds were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus sp., Aeromonas sp., Streptococcus sp., Salmonella sp., Vibrio sp., Shigella sp., Proteus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Klebsiella sp. Enterobacter species occurred only in concrete pond, while Serratia species occurred in earthen ponds. The fungal genera isolated from both the concrete and earthen ponds were Aspergillus sp., Penicillum sp. and Cladosporium sp. The genera, Fusarium sp. and Mucor sp were isolated only from earthen ponds. The study revealed that the ponds were grossly contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms which poses a risk to human health, thus of significant public health concern.

 Keywords: Heterotrophic bacteria, fish ponds, fungal isolates, pathogens, physico-chemical properties.

 

  1. Author:  Ibiene AA, Okerentugba PO, and Akhigbemen OJ

Title: Effect of Some Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on growth of Piper nigra - Stem Cell 2013;4 (4)

Link: www.sciencepub.net/stem/stem0404/004_21515stem0404_17_26.pdf

Abstract: Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial bacteria that aggressively colonize plant roots and enhance plant growth by a wide variety of mechanisms such as phosphate solubilization, phytohormone production, antifungal activity, etc. In this study, effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on Piper nigra was examined. Azotobacter species, Nitrobacter species, and Nitrosomonas species were isolated and identified using standard methods. In-vitro screening of these PGPR was carried out to test their ability to produce phytohormones (siderophore, phosphate solubilization and indole acetic acid). Seed germination and seedling growth test were also conducted to evaluate the effect of PGPR on the germination of Piper nigra seeds. The growth parameters (plant height, stem width root length and the internode of the plant) were monitored at 5 days after planting (DAP) interval from the day of sprouting. The findings of the study showed that the ability to solubilize phosphate was exhibited by Nitrobacter species and Nitrosomonas species while Azotobacter species produce indole acetic acid (IAA) and siderphore. It also showed that the combined use of the three isolates gave the best performance in terms of enhanced increases in growth parameters than the control (treatment A). Thus, the use of combined biofertilizers is advocated for excellent growth performance of plants.

 

Keywords: Azotobacter species, Nitrobacter species, Nitrosomonas species, siderophore, phosphate solubilization, indole acetic acid, DAP, PGPR

 

  1. Author:  Charles Chibueze Ezekoye; Ebiokpo, Rebecca Amakoromo; Ibiene, Abiye Anthony

 

Title: Bioremediation of Hydrocarbon Polluted Mangrove Swamp Soil from the Niger Delta using Organic and Inorganic Nutrients - British Biotechnology Journal6.2 (2015): 62-78.

Link: http://search.proquest.com/openview/fd5ad3d64f644d3f48d3c3789397778d/1?pq-origsite=gscholar

Abstract: Aim: To achieve bioremediation of hydrocarbon impacted mangrove soil using organic (sterile and non-sterile poultry wastes) and inorganic nutrient (NPK).

Study Design: Three treatments and the control designs were setup in three replicates and kept in the laboratory at room temperature (28±2°C) throughout the investigation period (6 weeks). Three of the set-ups designated Treatments (SPW, NSPW and NPK) were treated with sterile poultry wastes, non-sterile poultry wastes, nitrogen - phosphorus- potassium, respectively, while the fourth set - up with no treatment were designated control (CTRL). Set ups SPW, NSPW and NPK were designed to determine the effects of sterile poultry wastes, non-sterile poultry wastes and NPK in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted soil, respectively. However, the control (CTRL) was designed to determine the contribution made by indigenous (autochthonous) microorganisms and natural attenuation to the soil.

Place and Duration of Study: Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria, between August, 2012 and June, 2013.

Methodology: A laboratory-scale study was carried out using organic (sterile and non-sterile poultry wastes) and inorganic nutrient (NPK) to achieve bioremediation of hydrocarbon impacted mangrove soil.

Results: In a 42 day study, the sterile poultry wastes (SPW) treated option had an increase in total logarithmic heterotrophic bacterial count from 5.19±0.01 to 7.64±0.08 while non-sterile poultry wastes (NSPW) increased from 5.22±0.11 to 7.65±0.06. The logarithmic heterotrophic bacterial population of the NPK set-up increased from 5.23±0.11 to 7.90±0.10. The untreated set up had its total logarithmic heterotrophic bacterial count increased from 5.14±0.07 to 6.63±0.08. The total logarithmic hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria in SPW, NSPW and NPK treated options increased from 3.70±0.10 to 7.11±0.10, 3.82±0.10 to 7.20±0.10 and 3.93±0.08 to 7.73±0.07, respectively, at which time the corresponding value obtained for untreated increased from 3.63±0.06 to 5.56±0.06. Statistical analyses showed significant difference at p<0.05 level for the four conditions. Several genera of bacteria were isolated as hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria. They include Bacillus sp., Citrobacter sp., Corynebacterium, Escherichia sp., Flavobacterium, Micrococcus, Pseudomonas sp., Salmonella sp. and Vibrio sp. The conductivity values nitrate and phosphate concentrations in SPW, NSPW, and NPK options decreased progressively with slight decrease in the untreated. At day 42, the changes in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) decreased to 498.14±0.01 ppm, 389.42±0.01 ppm, 285.38±0.01 ppm and 1087.00±0.01 ppm in SPW, NSPW, NPK and untreated, respectively.

Conclusion: The use of organic sources such as poultry wastes (sterile and non-sterile) and inorganic nutrient (NPK) has shown good promises in the bioremediation of hydrocarbon impacted mangrove soil.

  1. Author:  A. A. Ibiene, P. O. Okerentugba, F. A. Orji1, and E. N. Dike

Title: Physico-chemical and Culture-dependent Microbiological Characterization of Spent Pleurotus Composts from Three Different Agro-based Wastes - Journal of Advances in Biology & Biotechnology 3(4): 173-183, 2015

Link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Frank_Orji/publication/277974264_Physico-chemical_and_Culture-dependent_Microbiological_Characterization_of_Spent_Pleurotus_Composts_from_Three_Different_Agro-based_Wastes/links/560082dc08aec948c4fa8fa2.pdf

Abstract: Aim: Physico-chemical and culture-dependent microbiological properties of spent mushroom compost (SMC) were investigated.

Study Design: The physico-chemical and microbiological properties of spent mushroom composts were determined using standard methods.

Place and Duration of the Study: The study was conducted at the Department of Biotechnology, Federal Institute of Industrial Research, oshodi, Lagos-Nigeria between September to December, 2012.

Results: The CW-SMC, SD-SMC, and BSG-SMC, had a total nitrogen content of 30.52 mg/Kg,22.54 mg/Kg, and 14.20 mg/Kg, respectively while total phosphorus was observed as 14.10 mg/Kg, 12.45 mg/Kg, and 6.45 mg/Kg, respectively. In all the SMC’s studied, Ca had the highest concentration (5.30-6.60 meq/100 g) among other exchangeable cations. The concentrations of Pb, Vn, Fe, Cr, and Ni were within the range of 0.02 mg/kg-8.93 mg/kg but BSG-SMC had the least concentrations of heavy metals. Quantitative compost microbiological analyses showed heavy loads of total culturable hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (1.8-11 x 104cfu/g) and fungi (4.4-8.5 x 104cfu/g) counts. Hydrocarbon utilizing microorganisms associated with the SMC’s were: Penicillium sp., Aspergillus niger, Pleurotus ostreatus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Burkholderia species.

Conclusion: SMC’s are good sources of limiting nutrients and hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms.

 

Keywords: Petroleum hydrocarbon; Hydrocarbon degraders; spent mushroom compost; agro-allied waste.

 

  1. Author:  Chinyere Augusta Ajuzieogu, Abiye Anthony Ibiene and Herbert Okechukwu Stanley

 

Title: Laboratory study on influence of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on growth response and tolerance of Zea mays to petroleum hydrocarbon - African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol. 14(43), pp. 2949-2956, 28 October, 2015

Link: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/ajb/article/view/126098/115627

Abstract: The influence of rhizobacteria on the growth and tolerance of Zea mays (maize) in a petroleum hydrocarbon (crude oil) impacted medium was investigated. This study evaluated the effect of inoculating maize seeds with plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains in a crude oil impacted medium. The rhizobacterial strains used in this study were tested for plant growth promoting traits [indole-3-acetic acid production, siderophore production, phosphate solubilisation and 1- aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity] following standard methods and plant root and shoot elongation activity of these strains were assayed using modified root elongation assay. The isolates were identified as Bacillus circulans, Enterobacter intermedius and Staphylococcus carnosus, by analytical profile index (API). The results showed that seeds inoculated with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) exhibited significant vegetative growth at various petroleum crude oil concentrations (1, 2 and 4 ml) compared with uninoculated seeds. The root and shoot length of inoculated seeds were 10.2 and 4.3 cm (B. circulans), 7.2 and 1.7 cm (E. intermedius), 5.2 and 3.8 cm (S. carnosus) and 0.9 and 1.5 cm (uninoculated), all at 1 ml concentration of petroleum crude oil. Tolerance Index (TI) for PGPR inoculated maize seeds in the crude oil impacted medium was highest with B. circulans (2.08 to 1.92), S. carnosus (0.69 to 0.59) and E. intermedius (0.79 to 0.71).

Thus, this study suggests that B. circulans could be employed as a crude oil tolerant rhizobacterium (PGPR) for mitigating the toxic effects of crude oil on plants and subsequently enhancing the plant growth in a crude oil-impacted soil.

 

Keywords: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, tolerance index, crude-oil, impacted medium, growth parameters.

 

  1. Author:  Anafe Michael Ugbong, Abiye Anthony Ibiene, Chioma Nkeiruka Onuoha, and C. Okorie Iheanyichukwu Patrick

 

Title: Effect of Convergent Rays on Coliform and Total Culturable Heterotrophic Bacteria in Water - British Microbiology Research Journal 7(1): 48-54, 2015, Article no.BMRJ.2015.094

Link: www.academia.edu/download/37147982/Ugbong712014BMRJ15696-1.pdf

Abstract: Aims: Verification of the effect of convergent rays on coliform and total culturable heterotrophic bacteria counts (TCHBC) in River (surface water), well and borehole (underground) water bodies around Choba and Aluu communities.

Place and Duration of Study: The efficiency of convergent ray’s disinfection of surface (Rivers) and underground (well and Borehole) water bodies was conducted on Choba and Aluu communities water samples in River State, Nigeria in the Department of Microbiology laboratory, University of Port Harcourt between November, 2012 to December, 2013.

Methodology: Different volumes of water samples were exposed to converged rays for 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours intervals using a circular-dish ray concentrator covered with Aluminum foil paper as the reflecting material. The TCHBC was determined using bacterial plate counts while the coliform population was determined using the most probable number multiple tube technique.

Results: The study showed that coliform and TCHBC population had the same logarithmic values at 0 hour and after 2 hours of exposure (1.2 logMPN/100 ml and 2.2 log cfu/ml). The coliformpopulation of the 2 and 4 Litre aliquots decreased from 1.2 and 2.2 to 0.0 log MPN/100 ml after 8 hours while the total culturable heterotrophic bacterial population decreased from 2.1 and 2.2 for 0 hour to 0.9 and 1.2 log cfu/ml after eight (8) hours of exposure. The pH of water samples were as follows; River water 5.0, Well 6.4 and borehole 7.0 respectively.

Conclusion: The research was able to provide satisfactory and dependable results compared to World Health Organization and Environmental Protection Agency WHO and EPA drinking water standard with MPN/100 ml to be 0.0 log MPN/100 ml and 0.9 and 1.2 cfu/ml total culturable heterotrophic bacteria count after 8 hours of exposure compared to 1.2 log MPN/ml and 2.2 logcfu/ml before the convergent rays exercised; thus, the study justifies the use of convergent rays for water disinfection.

 

Keywords: Water; Convergent Rays; Disinfection; Coliform; Heterotrophic Bacteria; River State.

 

  1. Author:  Anafe Michael Ugbong, Abiye Anthony Ibiene, Chioma Nkeiruka Onuoha

 

Title: RESPONSE OF SALMONELLA-SHIGELLA AND VIBRO SPECIES IN WATER TO CONVERGENT RAY’S DISINFECTION

Link: www.academia.edu/download/39100958/RESPOSNSE_OF_SALMONELLA-SHIGELLA_AND_VIBRIO_ON_WATER_corrected-1.docx

Abstract: Aim: Determination of the response of Salmonella-shigella and Vibrio population to convergent rays was studied using surface and underground water bodies.

Place and Duration of study: The study was conducted in Choba and Aluu communities’ water samples in

River State, Nigeria in the Department of Microbiology laboratory, University of Port Harcourt between

November, 2012 to December, 2013.

Methodology:  The presence of Salmonella-shigella (SS) and Vibrio spp were examined using hours of exposure and volume of water. Different volumes of water samples were exposed to converged rays for 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours intervals using a circular-dish ray concentrator covered with Aluminium foil paper as the reflecting material. The Salmonella-shigella and Vibrio populations were determined using bacterial plate counts.

Results: Result showed that Salmonella-shigella and Vibrio population in the test volumes were high (1.7, 1.8 and 1.2, 1.3 log cfu/ml), but decreased to 0.0 cfu/ml after eight (8) hours of exposure in River water samples while at zero (0) hour the logarithmic population  of Salmonella-shigella and Vibrio populations in 2 and 4 litres aliquots of well water sample were 1.7, 1.8 and 1.1, 1.3 (log cfu/ml) but after 6 hours interval of exposure, insignificant colonies with logarithmic values of 0.6,1.0 log cfu/ml SS count and 0.5 log cfu/ml Vibrio were isolated. But Vibrio sp in 2 litres volume showed no growth.

Conclusion: The treatment process lasted for a period of 8 hours on each day of exposure providing satisfactory data that greed with World health organization standard of 0.0 log cfu/ml for drinking water thus, justifying the use of convergent rays as a means of water disinfection.

 

Keyword: Convergent Rays, Salmonella-shigella and Vibrio population, water disinfection, Rivers State.

 

You are here: Home Publications publication-col1 Research Publications A. A. Ibiene