Research Publications

Dr. Kpolovie Peter James

Kpolovie, P. J. is an Associate Professor and the Acting Director of Academic Planning, Research and Control Unit at University of Port Harcourt. He is an accomplished product of University of Port Harcourt, and an expert in Psychological Testing, Educational Measurement and Evaluation. His PhD thesis on validation and standardization of Culture Fair Intelligence Test for use in Nigeria won the National Universities Commission’s Best Doctoral Thesis Award in 2002. He also won the prestigious University of Port Harcourt School of Graduate Studies’ Silver Jubilee Award of Excellence in 2007, in addition to winning the Distinct African Gold Award (DAGA) by WDG, in collaboration with Peak Laureals Magazine, in 2015 and the Common Wealth Scholarship in 1994. From 2003 to 2006, he successfully served in the Bayelsa State Executive Council. Peter James Kpolovie has over 40 national and more than 50 international publications in professional journals. He is a member of the Board of Editors or Team of Reviewers of a number of international journals. Some of his other publications include eight groundbreaking books: Excellent Research Methods; Handbook of Research on Enhancing Teacher Education with Advanced Instructional Technologies; Test, Measurement and Evaluation in Education; The Making of the United States of America: Lessons for Nigeria; Statistical Techniques for Advanced Research; Advanced Research Methods; Educational Reforms without Evaluation Designs: Nigeria at Risk; and Educational Management in Developing Economies.  His research interests include use of Information and Communication Technology in education and in data analyses; educational evaluation; improvement of human learning; educational management; and test development, validation and standardization.

He may be reached with the number, +2348088061666 or via E-mail, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.    or Website, www.kpoloviepj.com  

The titles, functional links and abstracts of some of P. J. Kpolovie’s publications that are available online are listed herein. Kindly click the link for each of his publications to study and benefit from the wealth of knowledge therein. 

 

ABSTRACTS OF P. J. KPOLOVIE’S PUBLICATIONS


1.
Ololube, N. P.; Kpolovie, P. J. & Makewa, L. N. (2015).
Handbook of Research on Enhancing Teacher Education with Advanced Instructional Technology. PA, USA: Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global). ISBN 13: 978146668162; EISBN 13: 9781466681637; DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8162-0 
http://www.igi-global.com/book/handbook-research-enhancing-teacher-education/120264

Back Cover:

Before today’s teachers are ready to instruct the intellectual leaders of tomorrow, they must first be trained themselves. Information and communication technology can greatly increase the effectiveness of this training and also aid teachers as they seek to bring the latest technological advancements into their own classrooms.

The Handbook of Research on Enhancing Teacher Education with Advanced Instructional Technologies explains the need to bring technology to the forefront of teacher training. With an emphasis on how information and communication technology can provide richer learning outcomes, this book is an essential reference source for researchers, academics, professionals, students, and technology developers in various disciplines.

The book has decisively covered burning areas like curriculum design and trends in higher education; curriculum development and scientific research; education and globalization; online and blended learning; the 21st century library and Information Services; use of Communication Technologies in adult education; and video use in teacher education.

 

2.
Ololube, N. P.; & Kpolovie, P. J. (Eds.) (2012).
Educational Management in Developing Economies: Cases ‘n’ school effectiveness and quality improvement. Saarbucken, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. ISBN 978-3-8465-8931-1. Also printed in the U.S.A. and the U.K.  
http://www.amazon.com/Educational-Management-Developing-Economies-Effectiveness/dp/3846589314

 

Back Cover:

The field of educational management is one that requires a high level of problem solving, critical thinking and interpersonal skills to solve problems that are often complex and multi-dimensional. Analyzing cases proves an opportunity to explore professional issues through an environment that allows novice, practitioners and students to analyze and reflect on relevant theories, concepts and techniques to understand a real problem, ponder solutions and consequences, and develop responses. Based on this, the International Journal of Scientific Research in Education (IJSRE) decided to publish this book that promotes the advancement of education at secondary and higher education levels that encompass all domains of teaching and learning. The primary mission of the book is to serve as a medium for initiating, collaborating, analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating original and ground-breaking contributions to the theory, practice and research in educational management applicable to secondary and higher education. Educational Management in Developing Economies: Cases ‘n’ School Effectiveness and Quality Improvement brought together a wide range of scenarios in educational agendas.

 

 

3.
Kpolovie, P. J.; Obilor, I. E.; & Ololube, N. P. (2015).
Merits and worth of the National Open University of Nigeria as an educational intervention.
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/merits-and-worth-of-national-open-university-of-nigeria-as-distance-education-intervention/133808

  • Abstract:

This chapter employed Program Theory-Based Evaluation Design and Summative Evaluation Model to evaluate the merits and worth of National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN) from 2003 to 2013 as a distance education intervention. A sample of 902 was drawn from students of and staff of NOUN, National Universities Commission and conventional Federal Universities in Nigeria. Construct validated Program Theory-based Evaluation Questionnaire with reliability coefficient of 0.79 was used. Ten hypotheses were tested using ANOVA and independent samples t-test at 0.05 alpha. Results indicated that great discrepancy exists between the expected and actual outcomes of NOUN as it is significantly inadequate in addressing ‘higher education for all in need' intervention for which it was established. Though the objectives for which NOUN was established has been partially implemented as defined and aspects of its objectives achieved. The study recommends that the defected aspects of NOUN should be modified to meat stated objectives.

 

4.
Ololube, N. P.; Major, N. B. & Kpolovie, P. J. (2015).
Current Economic and Political Dispensation and Teacher Education Programs in Niger Delta Region: Means of Enhancing Teacher Education.
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/current-economic-and-political-dispensation-and-teacher-education-programs-in-niger-delta-region/133826 

 

Abstract:

In this chapter we highlighted the impact of the current economic and political dispensation in Nigeria and its impact on teacher education programs and the means of enhancing teacher education in the Niger Delta region. This paper is a conceptual and methodological breakthrough in Nigeria's academic landscape where qualitative and quantitative experiences highlight issues that are pertinent to teacher education program in the Niger Delta. The chapter proposed that the Niger Delta region's and the entire Nigeria's teacher education programs would be advanced if the component parts of the current economic and political disposition are resolved. This chapter contends that the Niger Delta region has the potential to address the challenges currently faced in the region such as social disruption (violence threat), poverty, hunger, disease, conflict, marginalization, and the achievement and improvement for effective teacher education programs. This chapter is of the immense judgment that successfully addressing the challenges currently faced in the Niger Delta region, teacher education programs will greatly improve qualitatively and quantitatively.

 

5.
Kpolovie, P. J
.; Joe, A. I. & Okoto, T. (2014).
Academic Achievement Prediction: Role of Interest in Learning and Attitude towards School.
International Journal of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education (IJHSSE). 1(11), 73-100.
http://www.arcjournals.org/pdfs/ijhsse/v1-i11/10.pdf

 

Abstract:

Multiple prediction design was adopted to ascertain the magnitude of relationship and prediction that students’ interest in learning and attitude to school individually and collectively have on their academic achievement. A stratified random sample of 518 was drawn with the aid of table of random numbers from the 14459 students who enrolled for the 2013 May/June Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (SSCE) in Bayelsa State. Multiple regression statistical technique was used for analysis with SPSS to test tenability of each postulated null hypothesis at 0.05 alpha. Results showed significant correlation and multiple prediction of students’ academic achievement with the predictor variables; 21.60% of the variance in students’ academic performance. Thus, improvement of students’ interest in learning and attitude to school could contribute in boosting their performance academically.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Attitude towards school, Interest in learning, Multiple prediction design, SSCE.

 

6.
Joe, A. I.; Kpolovie, P. J.; Osonwa, K. E. & Iderima, C. E. (2014).
Modes of admission and academic performance in Nigerian Universities.
Merit Research Journal of Education and Review. 2(9), 203-230. http://meritresearchjournals.org/er/content/2014/September/Kpolovie%20et%20al.pdf

 

Abstract:

With causal comparative ex-post facto design, this investigation comparatively analysed academic performance of graduates admitted through Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination/Post Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME/PUTME) and Preliminary Programmes (Certificate, Basic Studies and School of Science Laboratory Technology [SSLT]) in University of Port Harcourt. Nine research questions and hypotheses were postulated. A stratified random sampling technique was used to draw a sample of 1,200 from a population of 13,898 regular programmes graduates of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 academic sessions from seven faculties. The Cumulative Grade Point Averages of the graduates were collected from the Exams and Records Office. While the first eight null hypotheses were tested with Independent Samples T-test, the ninth was tested with Two-way Analysis of Variance at 0.05 alpha. Results showed that graduates who were admitted through the Preliminary Programmes performed significantly better than their counterparts who were admitted through the UTME/PUTME in all the Faculties except in Agricultural Science and Engineering. A Comparison of the four modes of admission showed the Certificate Programme has produced graduates with the best academic performance, followed respectively by the Basic Studies, SSLT and UTME/PUTME programmes.

Keywords: Academic performance, Causal comparative ex-post facto design, Graduates, Modes of admission, Preliminary programmes, University of Port Harcourt, UTME/PUTME

 

 

7.
Kpolovie, P. J. (2014).
Quality assurance in the Nigerian educational system: Matters arising. Academia Education.

https://www.academia.edu/17888532/QUALITY_ASSURANCE_IN_THE_NIGERIAN_EDUCATIONAL_SYSTEM

 

Abstract:

This is a captivating PowerPoint presentation that completely evaluated the state of education in Nigeria and clearly indicated the extent to which quality assurance/control is present in the educational system under these listed headlines.

Introduction

Quality Assurance/Quality Control

Dimensions of Quality in Education Performance of Nigerian Universities

Tools for QA/QC

Usurpation of QA/QC

Supremacy of Evaluation in QA/QC

Evaluation Models

Conclusion

NAEC

 

8.
Kpolovie, P. J. & Obilor, I. E. (2014).
Utilitarian evaluation of the National Open University of Nigeria.
Merit Research Journal of Education and Review.
http://www.meritresearchjournals.org/er/content/2014/March/Kpolovie%20and%20Obilor.pdf ISSN: 2350-2252. 2(3), 028-053.

 

Abstract:

This study employed Utilitarian Evaluation Design and Discrepancy Evaluation  Model,  which  are  the  most  suitable  in  educational programme evaluation, to evaluate the National Open University of Nigeria  (NOUN)  from  its  commencement  of  admission  in  2003  to 2013. The study covered headquarters and all the 49Study Centres of  NOUN  throughout  the  six  geopolitical  regions  in  Nigeria.  A sample  of  902  was  drawn  from  students  of  NOUN,  and  staff  of NOUN, National Universities Commission and conventional Federal Universities  in  Nigeria. A highly valid Utilitarian Evaluation Questionnaire with reliability coefficient of 0.86 was developed for data  collection.  The  research  questions  were  answered  using measures of central tendency, and the hypotheses were tested with One-Way  Analysis  of  Variance  and  independent  samples  t-test  at 0.05 alpha. Results indicated that though NOUN has  been partially implemented  as  defined  with  aspects  of  the  objectives  achieved; great disparity exists between the expected and actual outcomes; and that NOUN is significantly inadequate in addressing the ‘higher education for all in need’ intervention for which it was established. It  was  recommended  among  others  that  funding  of  NOUN  be increased,  more  Study  Centres  established,  and  a  National  Open and Distance Education Commission be established to supervise, monitor and regulate the NOUN. Keywords:  Utilitarian  evaluation  design,  Summative  evaluation model, National  Open  University  of  Nigeria,  Higher  education,  Open  and Distance learning, Life-long learning.

 

9.
Kpolovie, P. J.; Iderima, E. C. & Ololube, N. P. (2014).
Computer literacy and candidate performance on computer-based test.  In N. P. Ololube (Ed). Advancing technology and educational development through blended learning in emerging economies. USA: Information Science References (an imprint of IGI).  ISSN: 2326-8905; eISSN: 2326-8913.  80-106. Retrieved October 10, 2014 from http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/barriers-to-blended-teaching-and-learning-in-sub-saharan-africa/83456 

 

Abstract:

This chapter investigates the influence of computer literacy through blended learning methods on the computer-based aptitude test performance of prospective students at the University of Port Harcourt. An ex-post facto research design was used, and simple random sampling was adopted in drawing a sample of 1,720 candidates from a total population of 38,988 who wrote the examinations. A Computer Literacy Scale was developed to ascertain the computer literacy level of participants and a Results Collection Form was developed to gather test results. This study was based around nine research questions, which were answered using descriptive statistics, and nine corresponding hypotheses, which were tested using inferential statistics. Results show that computer literacy through blended leaning methods has a significant effect on performances on the computer-based test while gender has no effect. There was also a significant difference in the performance of candidates on paper and computer examinations.

 

10.
Ololube, N. P.; Umunadi, K. E. & Kpolovie, P. J. (2014).
Barriers to Blended Teaching and Learning in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges for the next decade and beyond. In N. P. Ololube (Ed). Advancing technology and educational development through blended learning in emerging economies. USA: Information Science References (an imprint of IGI). ISSN: 2326-8905; eISSN: 2326-8913.  232-247. Retrieved October 10, 2014 from http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/barriers-to-blended-teaching-and-learning-in-sub-saharan-africa/83456  232-247.

 

Abstract:

This chapter explains the need to better design blended teaching and learning curricula, the need to address infrastructural problems, and the need to organise programmes so that faculty and students can better plan for unanticipated and unintended situations that confront them in the teaching and learning processes. Improving the quality of education through the diversification of content and methods and promoting experimentation, innovation, the diffusion and sharing of information, and best practices are among UNESCO’s recent strategic objectives in education. Discussions in this chapter centre on (1) the contexts of blended teaching and learning, (2) the barriers to blended learning usage, integration, and diffusion, and (3) the need to consider policy outcomes when evaluating blended teaching and learning resources. This study uses a qualitative research method, as both document materials and observation were an essential part of this chapter. This study concludes that the great enthusiasm around blended teaching and learning in sub-Saharan Africa has been dampened by inadequacies in essential services and infrastructures, such as electricity and telecommunication services, and institutional, socio-cultural, and economic barriers. Nonetheless, the development of blended teaching and learning resources continues.

 

11.
Briggs, T.; Ololube, N. P. & Kpolovie, P. J. (2014).
Managing children learning: Support-based screening procedure for motor, cognition and language communication in early childhood education. Education and Life-Long Learning Journals. 8(2), 168-193.
http://inderscience.metapress.com/content/t326626pn0521411/

 

Abstract:

Support-based screening procedures (SBSP) for motor, cognition and language communication in early childhood education (ECE) are aimed at identifying general developmental problems in children. The difficulties associated within carrying out screening procedures in developing and developed societies are very different, as are the methods for selecting appropriate SBSP for preschool children in these two contexts. This study gathered data using Kochung’s (2000) questionnaire on SBSP, however, it was modified to suit the present research framework. To satisfy this investigation, a number of statistical analyses were conducted: descriptive statistics (percentages, mean point value, standard deviation), chi square and one-way-analysis of variance (ANOVA). This study confirmed that children from rural areas need more support than children in the urban areas and that the achievement levels of children depend on the educational level and occupational status of parents and number of siblings. The study further revealed the validity and reliability of the use of SBSP when assessing children’s support needs and general developmental problems. This study recommends that children be screened in the preschool years so as to detect any developmental problems and enable early intervention.

Keywords: Education policy, Support-based, Screening, Motor, Cognition, Language communication, Preschool children, Management in education, Nigeria.

 

12.
Kpolovie, P. J. & Ololube, N. P. (2013). The indispensability of utilitarian evaluation design.
International Journal of Scientific Research in Education.
http://www.ijsre.com/Vol.,%206_2_-Kpolovie%20&%20Ololube.pdf ISSN: 1117-3209. 6(2), 159-178

Abstract:

This  article  avers  that  the  application  of  a  utilitarian  evaluation  design  adopted  in  pure  and unbiased  evaluation  research  to  produce  the  very  best  decision  alternatives  about  a  program that  it  is  hoped  will  be  of  greatest  practical  utility  and  propriety  to  all  stakeholders  of  the program  and  society  in  general,  is  indispensable  in the  genuine  reformation  of  Nigerian education. Utilitarian evaluation design maximizes the satisfaction that society can derive from the  program  under  investigation.  This  research  design  uses  cost-benefit  analyses  that  are utilitarian,  egalitarian,  scholarly,  ethical,  and  libertarian  in  the  evaluation  of  an  education program  to  achieve  the  best  outcomes  for  all  stakeholders.  Without  thorough  and  due evaluation,  no  program  has  been,  and  perhaps  none  will  ever  be,  successful.  For  any component  of  the  Nigerian  education  system  to  be  successful  by  international  standards,  it must be regularly subject to utilitarian evaluation design.

Key words:  Utilitarian  evaluation  design,  Program  evaluation,  Education  reform  in  Nigeria, Utilitarian evaluation execution guidelines, Evaluation research, Evaluation design, Evaluation approaches, Pseudo-evaluation.

 

 

13.
Kpolovie, P.J. & Obilor, I. E. (2013a).
Higher education for all in need through the National Open University of Nigeria: A paradox in policy practice.
Merit Research Journal of Education and Review (MRJER). http://meritresearchjournals.org/er/content/2013/September/Kpolovie%20and%20Obilor.pdf ISSN: 2350-2282. 1(8), 172-180.

Abstract:

This  investigation  adopted  Program  Theory-Based Evaluation Design in assessing the  merit  and  worth  of  National  Open  University  of  Nigeria (NOUN), strictly in line with the  institution’s mission statement, goal, and policy of “higher education for all in need”; to ascertain access to, and the degree  of  equilibrium  in  the  demand  and  supply  of higher education in Nigeria. Results revealed that of the total number of candidates applying for higher  education  admission  in  Nigeria  between  2003  and  2012, only 13.12% to 26.52%  succeeded  into Nigerian Universities, Polytechnics, Colleges of Education; denying 73.48%  to 86.88% of candidates access to higher education. It was low access to higher education in the country that necessitated establishment of the NOUN in 1983 to ensure equity and equality of opportunities and wider access to education with a view to mopping up all who need higher education but are left out by the conventional education system.   Results further showed that the government’s policy of “higher  education  for  all in need through the NOUN” is merely a paradox in policy practice; because NOUN has not and can never cope with the demand for higher education in Nigeria as it only admitted 0.03% to 1.89% of the candidates seeking higher education between 2003 and 2012.   It was suggested that improved power supply and internet connectivity, more study centres especially in the rural areas,  increased  funding  of  NOUN,  and  the  establishment  of  a  National Open  and  Distance  Education  Commission  for  effective  and efficient supervision of NOUN, will make the National Open University of Nigeria the “Higher Education Messiah” that it was intended to be.

Keywords: Higher education for all in need;  Program theory-based evaluation design; Paradox  in  policy  practice;  Open  and  Distance  Education; Access to higher education;  National  Open  University  of  Nigeria; Higher education.

 

14.
Kpolovie, P.J. & Obilor, I. E. (2013b).
Nigerian universities bag ludicrous ranks in world rankings of universities.
Universal Journal of Education and General Studies.

http://universalresearchjournals.org/ujegs/pdf/2013/September/Kpolovie%20and%20Obilor.pdf

Abstract:

This  research  adopted  documentary  analysis  design  to  ascertain  the  relative  position  of  Nigerian universities  in  world  rankings  of  universities.  Though as the major agency  for  both  personal  and national development, university education is expected to be the main driver in the realization of the national goals of Nigeria; the country has continued to pay preposterous attention to it. Consequently, compared to other universities as shown in the various objective rankings of universities in the globe, Nigerian universities are nowhere as they bagged highly ludicrous ranks. No Nigerian university qualified to make the top best 3000 universities as ranked by Academic Ranking of World Universities, QS World University Rankings, and Times Higher Education World University Rankings. Even the very best  university  in Nigeria,  Obafemi  Awolowo  University,  as  ranked  by  the  liberal  Ranking  Web  of Universities  in  2013,  did  not  qualify  to  be  among  the  top  1100  best  universities  in  the  world.   The almighty University of Ibadan is ranked 2,109th; the much talked about American University in Nigeria bagged 6,367th position; the unique University of Port Harcourt is ranked 7326th ; and as much as 101 of the 125 universities in Nigeria do not qualify to even fall within 10,000 universities in the world. In Africa alone, Nigerian universities are trailing far behind.
 

Keywords: Ludicrous ranks; World rankings of universities; Nigerian universities; Teaching profession; Fate of Nigerian universities, Nigerian flag.

 

15.
Kpolovie, P. J. & Obilor, I. E. (2013c).
Adequacy-inadequacy: Education funding in Nigeria. Universal Journal of Education and General Studies.

http://universalresearchjournals.org/ujegs/pdf/2013/August/Kpolovie%20and%20Esezi.pdf

http://universalresearchjournals.org/ujegs/abstracts/2013/August/Kpolovie%20and%20Esezi.htm

ISSN: 2277-0984. 2(8), 239-254.

Abstract:

No nation can develop beyond the quality of its education, as a nation’s overall advancement is a direct function of the quality of the educational attainment of its citizens. Quality of education depends on a nation’s funding of the sub-sector. Nigeria has laudable constitutional provisions to ensure complete government participation in, and financing of education.  The extent  to  which  this  funding  is  done, whether  adequate  or  inadequate,  is  the  problem  investigated  in  this  study.  This research  adopted documental  analysis  design  to  review  the  trend  of  education  funding  (budgetary  allocations  to  the education sector) from 1960 – 2013 in Nigeria; comparing it with some other countries. Four apposite null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 alpha.  Results showed that Nigeria’s  budgetary  allocation  to education is significantly less than (i) the minimum 26% recommendation by UNESCO over the years; and (ii) the budgetary allocations to education by  20 World Bank sampled countries in 2012; that (iii) Nigeria’s score is significantly lower than the African average on the Education Sub-category of Ibrahim Index for African Governance from 2006 to 2012; and iv) no Nigerian university falls within the top 2000 world  universities.  Education  in  Nigeria  has  suffered  gross  financial  neglect  to  the  detriment  of  the future  of  children,  youths  and  adults;  and  of  the  national  development,  as  shocking  revelations  of annual  budgetary  allocations  as  low  as  0.5%  was  found.  Increased public and private funding is urgently needed to salvage the increasingly eroding quality of education in Nigeria. Keywords:  Adequacy–inadequacy, Education funding in Nigeria, Budgetary allocation to education, Quality of education, Public financing of education, Topmost 2000World University.

 

16.
Ololube, N. P.; Nwokolo, J. O.; Onyekwere, L. A.; & Kpolovie, P. J. (2013).
Fringe benefits and employee motivation in selected banks in Delta State of Nigeria.
African Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance (AJAAF) – Inderscience Publishers.
http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=55492. 2(1), 27-51.

 

Abstract:

This research work begins with a compact presentation of the general background to the study. The presentation provides readers who are not familiar with the topic of this research and the value given to banking employees in relation to their fringe benefits in Nigeria. A concerted review of the related literature was conducted. Professionals in business researchers ascertained the validity of the research instruments by reading through and making corrections where necessary. The questionnaires were pre-tested and the participants commented on the items before it was finally administered to the respondents. The reliability of the research instrument was statistically tested using SPSS version 18. The data collected was analysed to answer the specific research questions and hypotheses. The analysis of data involved the use of percentages means point value, standard deviation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson product moment correlation. The major findings from this study revealed that the basic roles of increased fringe benefits impacts on employee motivation.  

Keywords: fringe benefits; employee motivation; banks; job satisfaction; bank management; Nigeria; banking industry; bank employees.

 

17.
Ololube, N. P.; Kpolovie, P. J. & Amaele, S. (2013).
Issues of human security and educational development in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria.
African Education Review. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/18146627.2013.853540#preview   OR   http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/18146627.2013.853540   10(3), 453-482.

 

Abstract:

Drawing from documents, observation, interview and questionnaire, we highlighted the role of issues of human security and its impact on the educational development of the Niger Delta region as well as means of enhancing human security in Nigeria. This article is a conceptual and methodological breakthrough in Nigeria's academic land-scape where qualitative and quantitative experiences highlight issues that are pertinent to the educational development in The Niger Delta. Diverse statistical analyses were conducted using the Statistical Package of the Social Sciences version 18 to assess the study's hypotheses. It was predicted that the region would be advanced educationally and on all other development indices if human security issues are resolved. This paper contends that the Niger Delta region has the potential to address the challenges currently faced by Nigeria including social disruption, poverty, hunger, disease, conflict, marginalisation, and the achievement of the movement for Education For All by 2015. This paper is of the opinion that the successful integration of the Niger Delta region into federal planning, structures and funding will enhance development, livelihoods, and human security not only for the region but also for Nigeria's educational development.

Keywords: Human security; Education; Development; Niger Delta, Region; Nigeria. 

 

18.
Ololube, N. P.; Kpolovie, P. J.; Amanchukwu, R. N. & Briggs, T. (2013).
Digital natives and digital immigrants: A study of Information Technology and Information Systems (IT/IS) usage between students and faculty of Nigerian universities.
International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education
http://www.irma-international.org/viewtitle/83599/ 9(3), 42-64.

 

Abstract:

It is presumed that Nigerian students and teachers have been unable to find effective ways to use technology in the classroom and other aspects of their teaching and learning. Yet, considerable debate remains over the most efficient techniques and procedures to measure students and faculties information technology and information systems (IT/IS) use. In most developing countries, the challenges associated with carrying out IT/IS measurements are different from those in developed countries, as are the methods for selecting appropriate IT/IS content. This study gathered data using a five item demographic variable and a fifty item questionnaire to measure student and faculty academic IT/IS use in one private and one public university in Nigeria. This study is based on the 191 responses received to the questionnaire. The results reveal significant differences between the academic use of IT/IS by students and faculty. This groundbreaking study recommends that universities become valuable and proactive actors in the provision of technology based learning, teaching and research for students and academic staff to foster an effective academic environment aimed at meeting millennium development goals (MDG) for education. This scholarly discourse has implication for researchers, education practitioners, planners, policy makers and government.

 

19.
Ololube, N. P. & Kpolovie, P. J. (2013).
Literature and focus group analysis of the approaches and obstacle to effective educational planning in higher education in an emerging economy.
International Journal of Scientific Research in Education (IJSRE).
http://www.ijsre.com/Vol.,%206_3_-Ololube%20&%20Kpolovie.pdf  6(3), 233-254.

 

Abstract:

The Nigerian educational system has undoubtedly encountered a number of significant impediments in the last few decades and continues to struggle with the implementation and assurance of educational and teaching quality because of lack of effective planning. A shortage of accurate statistical data, financial, qualified planners, poor national economic performance, unsuitable governing structures, political interference, and general instability have all contributed to low quality in educational planning. This article looks at the meaning and context of educational planning, approaches and problems of educational planning. The paper employed literature and focused group analysis as sources of data collection. The study revealed that there is a significant relationship between the perception of male and female participants on the problems and approaches of educational planning in Nigeria. It further revealed that economic circumstance (finance), political interference, inaccurate statistical data and personnel among others are constraints to planning and implementation of educational programs in Nigeria. The paper concludes that in spite of the increasing complexity in universities administration created by rising students’ enrollments and problems of research, programs of study must be tailored to the ever-more complex needs of the society. Universities are established for the improvement of society and thus, socio-economic planners and educational planners need to cooperate in planning processes for the benefit of both the universities and society.

Keywords: Educational planning, Planning process, Problems, Approaches, Universities, Nigeria.

 

20.
Kpolovie, P. J. (2012).
Lumosity training and brain-boosting food effects on learning.
International Research Journals. 2(6), 217-230. ISSN: 2026-6332.

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/41602967/lumosity-training-and-brain-boosting-food-effects-on-learning

 

Abstract:

This randomized six-group experimental study investigated the effects of Lumosity Training, and Brain-Boosting Food on students’ learning, in order to proffer optimum functional or workable solution to the ever fresh question of how learning could best be improved. Seventy-two randomly drawn subjects and four  treatments  cum  two  control  conditions  were  randomized  into  six  groups  of  4  treatments  and  2 controls  of  12  each.  For  six  weeks  that  the  experiment  lasted,  while  one  of  the  experimental  brain boosting  food  groups  received  brain-boosting  food  (salmon,  mackerel  and  sardines,  that  are  rich  in omega-3 essential fatty acids as well as blueberries, mangoes plus watermelon that are antioxidant), the  other  received  suitable  dose  of  brain-boosting  food  supplements  (ginkgo  biloba  and  folic  acid), while eating normal food. While one of the two Lumosity training groups exercised the brain with it for 15 minutes twice a day, the other did for 30 minutes twice daily; each preceding a two-hour prep time. The control groups’ members of course, were accorded no treatment.  Results  showed  positive significant effects of Lumosity training and brain-boosting food on learning as subjects in each of the treatment  groups  learned  significantly  better  than  their  counterparts  in  the  control  groups. Consequently, brain-enhancement exercise with Lumosity training, and eating of brain-boosting food were recommended.

Keywords:  Lumosity training, brain-boosting food, learning, learning enhancement, randomized six-group experimental design.

 

 

21.
Ololube, N. P., Onyekwere, L. A. Kpolovie, P. J. (2012).
Human security and educational development in the Niger Delta Region.
Journal of Human Security. EISSN: 1835-3800.
http://blogs.unbc.ca/hsi/files/2012/06/JHS-81-front_merged.pdf#page=51  (1), 47-67. 

 

Abstract:

This  paper  examines  the  effect  of  Human  Security  (HS)  on  the  educational  development  of  the  oil  rich Niger  Delta  region  as  well  as  means  of  enhancing  human  security  in  Nigeria.  Within  a  HS  context,  and guided by the impact of oil exploration in the region, data for the study was gathered through documents, observation,  interviews  and  questionnaires.  Manifold  statistical  analyses  were  conducted  to  assess  the study’s  hypotheses.  This  paper  contends  that  the  Niger  Delta  region  has  the  potential  to  address  the challenges  currently  faced  by  Nigeria  including  social  disruption,  poverty,  hunger,  disease,  conflict, marginalisation, and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This paper argues that  the  effective  integration  of  the  region  into  federal  planning,  structures  and  funding  will  enhance development,  livelihoods,  and  human  security.  In  turn,  human  security  will  contribute  to  educational development and go a long way to sustaining national and regional progress. Keywords: Human Security, Education, Development, Niger Delta.

 

22.
Ololube, N. P., Amaele, S., Kpolovie, P. J., Onyekwere, L. A., & Elechi, G. E. (2012).
Quality higher education for improved knowledge essential for national and regional development.
International Journal of Education Economics and Development.
http://inderscience.metapress.com/content/x3p133180w7q4353/  OR
http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=47109 ISSN 1759-5681 (online) ISSN 1759-5673 (print). 3(2), 179-204.

Abstract:

General approaches to quality education, essential for national and regional development, are undergoing major global changes. In 2000, the United Nations solemnly reaffirmed the international development goals and as a result, the priority attached to a concerted fight for quality education has taken on a new dimension. This paper assesses the extent to which the Nigerian Government has made determined efforts to ensuring that quality education agendas are met. The study employs a quantitative approach to data collection and analysis. The results reveal that Nigeria is doing very little when it comes to achieving quality education towards meeting the millennium development goals (MDGs). Recommendations are proffered. This academic work is addressed to the Nigerian Government, National University Commission, Ministry of Education, education planners, researchers and development practitioners. Keywords: educational quality; higher education; knowledge improvement; standards; national development; regional development; universities; Nigeria; millennium development goals; MDGs.

 

23.
Briggs, T.; Ololube, N. P.; Kpolovie, P. J. & Amaele, S. (2012).
Evaluating the quality of public early childhood education and Vision 20: 2020: the role of government.
African Journal of Economic and Business Development.
http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=49289 1(3), 243-264.

Abstract:

This study was aimed at producing a systematic analysis and rich theoretical and empirical description of the quality of early childhood education (ECE) and the role of government in the actualisation of Vision 20: 2020. Vision 20: 2020 seeks to position Nigeria among the 20 largest economies in the world by the year 2020. The theoretical element of this study is comprised of a comprehensive literature review that focuses on research pertinent to the topic of this inquiry. To this end, it offers an opportunity to define terms systematically and to view problems as always interrelated with other components of society. The empirical part of this study (N = 222) involved using the statistical package of the social sciences (SPSS) version 18 to evaluate and interpret the quality of ECE objectives that can be achieved when governments play an active role in establishing access and equity, standards and quality assurance, teacher training and funding, and the elimination of resource wastage. We explored the perception of respondents as expressed while completing the questionnaire for this study. We recognised the respondents as agents who were able to appreciate discourses to build a perspective that has a continuous and constant renegotiated quality.

Keywords: quality assurance; academic achievement; Vision 20: 2020; government role; early childhood education; sustainable development; sustainability; Nigeria; access; equity; standards; teacher training; funding; waste elimination.

 

24.
Ololube, N. P. & Kpolovie, P. J. (2012).
Approaches to conducting scientific research in education, arts and the social sciences.
Online Journal of Education Research.
http://onlineresearchjournals.org/IJER/pdf/2012/june/Ololube%20and%20Kpolovie.pdf

 

Abstract:

This  article  examines  a  number  of  methodologies  used  in  conducting  effective  scientific  research.  It begins with an introduction to the significance of research methodology, followed by a description of research design, population, sampling, and sample size; it also involves a concise description of types of research instruments. The validity and reliability of effective investigations, as well as data collection methods  are  highlighted  as  is  the  need  for  use  of  both  qualitative  and  quantitative  techniques.  This present  study  employs  a  qualitative  research  design  that  used  document  analysis  to  evaluate approaches  to  research  methods.  The authors describe as holistic a representation as space could allow of the components of the themes of this study.  This study suggests that combining qualitative and quantitative methods adds rigor, breadth and depth to a scientific study.

Keywords: Scientific research, research design, methodology, qualitative, quantitative.

 

25.
Ololube, N. P.; Emejuru, P. I.; Kpolovie, P. J.;  Amaele, A.; & Uzorka, M. C. (2012).
Excellence in higher education: a powerful instrument for social and economic progress.  In, N. P. Ololube & P. J. Kpolovie. Educational Management in Developing Economies: Cases ‘n’ school effectiveness and quality improvement.
Saarbucken, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. ISBN 978-3-8465-8931-1. 
http://www.amazon.com/Educational-Management-Developing-Economies-Effectiveness/dp/3846589314       93-112.

 

Abstract:

Approaches to excellence in higher education, as powerful instrument for social and economic progress, are undergoing major changes. In 2000, the United Nations solemnly reaffirmed its international development goals and as a result, the concerted fight for quality education has taken on new meaning. This chapter assesses the extent to which the Nigerian government has made focused efforts to ensure that quality education agendas are met. This study employs a quantitative approach to data collection and analysis. Its results reveal that Nigeria is doing very little when it comes to achieving quality education as a component of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Recommendations are proffered. This work has been created with the following institutions in mind: the Nigerian government, the National Universities Commission, the Ministry of Education, education planners and researchers and development practitioners. 

 

26.
Kpolovie, P. J.
(2012).
Standard for data analyses in the 21st Century: overcoming the Nigerian quandary. In, N. P. Ololube & P. J. Kpolovie. Educational Management in Developing Economies: Cases ‘n’ school effectiveness and quality improvement.
Saarbucken, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. ISBN 978-3-8465-8931-1.
http://www.amazon.com/Educational-Management-Developing-Economies-Effectiveness/dp/3846589314    127-136.

 

Abstract:

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has revolutionized all spheres of human endeavour. Its effective use or otherwise in any field is almost synonymous now with the success or failure, respectively of that profession. The advancement of educational standards and knowledge in any nation is anchored solely in research, which in turn requires analyses of large volumes of objective data. Analogue analyses of such data are clumsy, cumbersome, tedious, daunting and highly susceptible to error. The standard for swift and accurate data analyses in the current century and beyond involves the application of ICT, such as SPSS. This chapter scrutinizes the Nigerian National Policy on Information and Technology (NNPIT) and the predicament in its implementation that fails to empower all researchers, evaluators, lecturers and graduate students with the requisite data analysis skills. This chapter addresses methods for overcoming the Nigerian quandary and enabling mastery of SPSS data analyses, as demonstrated in advanced research statistical techniques (Kpolovie, 2011), for every researcher in all fields of human endeavour.

 

 

27.
Ololube, N. P.; Ajayi, O. A.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Usoro, A. (2012).
Assessing the role and function of IT/IS training and development and policy implementation in a public organization. In, A. Usoro; G. Majewski; P. Ifinedo & I. I. Arikpo. Leveraging Developing Economies with the use of Information Technology: Trends and tools.
USA: Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global). ISBN 978-1-4666-1637-0 (hardcover)—ISBN 978-1-4666-1638-7 (ebook)—ISBN 978-1-4666-1639-4 (print & perpetual access).
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/assessing-role-function-training-development/65928  80-96.

 

Abstract:

This study investigates the dramatic changes in the public service in recent years. The paper examines employee Information Technology (IT) training and development in Nigerian Immigration services. This chapter fulfils the need for exploring the experiences in employee technological training and development and how these have impacted on their performances. Using a sample of 82 respondents, the research reported here portrays the paths which link the consequences of training and development on effective policy implementation. In this framework, IT training and development consequences in organizations represent a proxy in which employee training, actions, attitudes, and behaviours affect employees’ job effectiveness. Using multiple statistical analyses, the results indicate a mixed significance. Implications for strategic employee IT training and development policies are reported and suggestions for future research are discussed.

 

28.
Ololube, N. P.; Amaele, S.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Egbezor, D. E. (2012).
The issues of Digital Natives and Tourists: Empirical investigation on the level of IT/IS usage between university students and faculty members in a developing economy.  In, A. Usoro; G. Majewski; P. Ifinedo & I. I. Arikpo. Leveraging Developing Economies with the use of Information Technology: Trends and tools.
USA: Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global). ISBN 978-1-4666-1637-0 (hardcover)—ISBN 978-1-4666-1638-7 (ebook)—ISBN 978-1-4666-1639-4 (print & perpetual access).
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/issues-digital-natives-tourists/65937  238-255.

 

Abstract:

Frequently, it is presumed that Nigerian students and faculties have been unable to find effective ways to use technology in classroom and other aspects of their teaching and learning. Yet, considerable debate remains over the most efficient techniques and procedures to measure students and faculties IT/IS use. In most developing countries, the challenges associated with carrying out IT/IS measurements are different from those in developed countries, as are the methods for selecting appropriate IT/IS contents. The thrust of this chapter is to examine IT/IS contents with a view to analyze their meaning and impact on educational offerings. This study gathered data using a five item demographic variable and a fifty item questionnaire to measure student and faculty academic IT/IS use in two universities in Nigeria. This study is based on the 191 responses received to the questionnaire. The results reveal significant differences between the academic use of IT/IS by students and faculty members. This groundbreaking study recommends that universities become valuable and proactive actors in the provision of technology base learning, teaching and research for students and academic staff so as to foster an effective academic environment aimed at meeting MDG education goals. This scholarly discourse has implication for researchers, education practitioners, planners, policy makers and government.

 

29.
Ololube, N. P.; Egbezor, D. E.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Amaele, S. (2012).
Theoretical debates on school effectiveness research: lessons for Third World education development agendas. In, N. P. Ololube & P. J. Kpolovie. Educational Management in Developing Economies: Cases ‘n’ school effectiveness and quality improvement.
Saarbucken, Germany: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. ISBN 978-3-8465-8931-1.
http://www.amazon.com/Educational-Management-Developing-Economies-Effectiveness/dp/3846589314   1-18.

 

Abstract:

This study was guided by the premise that no nation can develop beyond the quality of its education. The authors thus offer an analysis of theoretical research based on the need for educational reform in Third World countries, particularly those in Africa. The aim of this analysis is to examine the wider context in which measures towards school effectiveness and improvement take place. This chapter focuses not only on what comprises school effectiveness and improvement, but also on the impact these have on teachers and students and the role they play in helping education to meet and address contemporary global changes. 

 

 

30.
Kpolovie, P. J.
(2011).
Hypothesis postulation: The what, why, how and which?
Journal of Education in Developing Areas (JEDA). Journal of the Faculty of Education, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.  
www.scribd.com/mobile/doc/59132454 19(1), 89- 98.

 

Abstract:
The great need for refocusing of education in Nigeria in this century and beyond can best be met with execution of more and more quantitative empirical research. Execution of such research demands postulation and testing of apposite hypotheses. Unfortunately however, it doubtlessly seems that many educational practitioners and researchers have lost or are losing focus on the enormous role of hypothesis in education and knowledge advancement. Therefore, this paper has thoroughly presented the meaning, the eight uses, the five characteristics and the two types as well as the two forms of hypothesis in addition to the seven steps for testing it. When educational researchers and practitioners acquire and apply the mastery knowledge of hypothesis as lucidly elucidated in this article, the quality of their research works will be tremendously improved and this will absolutely be reflected in refocusing of education in Nigeria.

 

31.
Kpolovie, P. J.
(2011).
Randomized six-group experimental design: A radical evolution. Journal of Education in Developing Area (JEDA). 19(2), 349-360.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/228328580/JEDA-Vol-19-No-2-Complete

 

Abstract:

Experimental research design is a most careful and thorough written plan of action to be meticulously adhered for execution of a truly genuine experiment with maximum validity in establishment of cause-and-effect relationships between independent and dependent variables. It vividly shows the entire what, how and when everything that constitutes the whole process of the experiment will be satisfactorily done to arrive at meaningful conclusions about causal relations in the variables of interest. Experimental research designs that are classically adopted by investigators have evolutionally ranged hierarchically from randomized between subjects after-only and randomized between subjects before-after, through randomized Solomon four-group design to randomized between subjects factorial design. Each higher design evolved from lower one(s) to overcome shortcomings of the latter. This article has posited and expounded randomized six-group experimental design that radically propels experimental research to its zenith. Randomized six-group experimental design robustly encompasses and surpasses the classical ones and completely overcomes their weaknesses to better meet the complexity of research in modern society.

Keywords: Randomized six-group design, Experimental research, Classical experimental designs, Experimental validity, Randomized experimental designs, Solomon four-group design, Statistical techniques.

 

 

32.
Kpolovie, P. J.
; Ololube, N. P.; & Ekwebelem, A. B. I. (2011).
Appraising the performance of secondary school students on the WAEC and NECO SSCE from 2004 to 2006.
International Journal of Scientific Research in Education (IJSRE).  
http://ijsre.com/Vol.,%204_2_-Kpolovie%20et%20al.pdf  ISSN 1117-3259. June 4(2), 105-114.

Abstract:

This investigation examines the performance of secondary school students on WAEC and NECO SSCE from 2004 to 2006. The researchers, having reason to doubt the parallel nature of the examinations conducted by WAEC and NECO, undertook a quantitative analysis of the performances of candidates in the SSCE in selected subjects – Mathematics, Economics, Government, Agricultural Science, Food and Nutrition, and Geography, so as to establish their comparability. The research design was correlational. A sample of 1,233 participants was drawn from a population of 1,422,140 examination candidates using a purposive sampling technique. The instruments for data collection included the WAEC and NECO SSCE Result Forms. Eleven hypotheses were tested with the Pearson correlation technique set at 0.05 alpha level. Findings indicate a statistically significant positive relationship between candidates’ performance on WAEC and NECO SSCE in all the subjects. 

 

 

33.
Ololube, N. P.; Ajayi, O. A.; & Kpolovie, P. J. (2011).
Adequacies and inadequacies: the relationship between training and development and organizational effectiveness in the Nigerian Immigration Services.
International Journal of Education Economics and Development.
http://www.inderscience.com ISSN 1759-5681 (online) ISSN 1759-5673 (print). 2(2) 140-155.

https://ideas.repec.org/a/ids/ijeded/v2y2011i2p140-155.html

Abstract:

This study investigates dramatic changes in Nigerian public service in recent years. Specifically, it examines employee training and development in Nigeria’s Immigration Services and the ways in which these have impacted employee performance. Using a sample of 82 respondents, the research portrays the paths which link training and development consequences with organisational effectiveness. In this framework, training and development consequences represent a proxy in which employee training, actions, attitudes, and behaviours affect job effectiveness. The results derived from multiple statistical analyses indicated a mixed significant. Implications for strategic employee training and development policies are imminent and suggestions for future research are discussed.  

 

 

34.
Ololube, N. P.; Briggs, T.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Ezindu, S. U. (2010).
Communicative approach as tool for relating reading and writing skills in early childhood education. Discourse and Communication for Sustainable Education.
Institute for Sustainable Education. Daugavpils Universities. LATVIA. 
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/dcse.2010.1.issue-2/dcse-2013-0013/dcse-2013-0013.xml   ISSN 1691-6301. 1(2), 34-54.

 

Abstract:

This study dwells upon communicative approach as a tool for relating reading and writing skills in early childhood education in a developing economy. The quantitative data were gathered through the use of structured questionnaires and was analysed using SPSS version 17. This study confirms that teachers in the selected early childhood education centers (ECEC) have no professional early childhood education qualifications and, as a result, are not qualified to effectively carry out their teaching responsibilities. It is hoped that this study can contribute to a deeper understanding of how early childhood education teachers perceive language teaching and consequently assist in the development of teacher education programmes and activities. Teacher training and education courses must play a more active role in informing trainee teachers of the institutional value of communicative approach in the teaching and learning of the English Language. This study provides parents, teachers, researchers, the public and those who manage education systems with new data that will help them to answer questions about the failing state of education in Nigeria.

Keywords: Communicative approach, Reading and writing, early childhood, education, professional, teaching competencies.

 

 

35.
Ololube, N. P.; Amaele, S.; & Kpolovie, P. J. (2009). To train or not to train?
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability.
http://www.cejsh.edu.pl/cejsh/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?10LAAAA084121 DOI: 10.2478/v10099-009-0036-z. 11(2), 64-76

Abstract:

This paper examines the professional and non-professional methodological competencies of secondary school teachers in Nigeria. The main focus of this study is to probe the impact of professional and non-professional methodological competencies as a predictor of teaching effectiveness. Although this exploration is survey research, a questionnaire was used for data gathering, and multiple statistical procedures were employed in the analysis. This study contributes to the field both in terms of theory and practice. Theoretically, it provides an outline of school effectiveness and quality improvement that can be used as a basis for further research. The study identifies factors that create barriers to methodological competencies for the two categories of teachers used in the investigation. It also describes the present situation on the ground in Nigerian secondary schools. At the practical level, this outline might guide school leaders, education planners and policy makers in their school effectiveness and quality improvement endeavors.

Key words: Professional; Non-professional; Teachers; Classroom; Methodological competencies. 

 

 

36.
Ololube, N. P.; Egbezor, D. E.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Ekpenyong, N. S. (2009).
Universities in Africa cannot wait: faculty perception of leadership, quality management for sustainable development. 7th International JTEFS/BBCC Conference Sustainable Development. Culture. Education. Research and implementation of Education for sustainable Development. LATVIA PROCEEDINGS.
Latvia: Daugavpils Universities Akademiskais Apgads “SAULE”.  
http://du.lv/files/000/003/433/PROCEEDINGS_2009_7th_JTEFS-BBCC_conference.pdf?1349678971       (May 5-8) 132-149.

Abstract:

Several African states have displayed “lack of urgency” in pressing universities to improve the way they prepare the human resources bases of their national economies. A significant aspect of the global reform movement in the public sector vis-à-vis higher education is to maintain balance between greater institutional autonomy and public accountability. This is particularly evident in the areas of teaching and research, leadership and management for sustainable development. The purpose of this research is to specifically evaluate the existing leadership styles and management practices in universities in Nigeria using Total Quality Management model to identify some excellence-related factors associated with success in the model. This research study fulfilled the need to provide the public sector administrators, policy makers, planners and researchers that are interested in empirical information methods that might help them improve the quality of universities with a framework and guide for assessing and planning towards sustainable improvement in the Nigerian education. This exploration is survey research design. The population of the study consists of university lecturers. A questionnaire was used for data gathering through a purposeful sampling procedure. The data were analyzed through the use of quantitative research procedures. The findings are that institutions need to adopt a holistic approach to the management of changes that addresses a wide range of issues related to effective leadership and management, staff development structure and systems reform, and effective financial management.

Key words: Faculty perception; Leadership; Quality management; sustainable development.

 

 

37.
Ololube, N. P.; Kpolovie, P. J.; & Egbezor, D. E. (2009).
Education policy analysis: the need to accelerate and redesign early childhood education preparation programmes.
International Journal of Education Economics and development.   
http://www.inderscience.com/info/inarticle.php?artid=29304   ISSN 1759-5681 (online) ISSN 1759-5673 (print). 1(2), 118-141.

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to give parents, teachers, researchers, the public and those who manage education systems; data that may help them answer questions about the failing state of early childhood education in Nigeria. This research employed a predominantly qualitative approach; however, the data for the study were gathered both quantitatively and qualitatively. Qualitative data were gathered through structured interviews, while quantitative data were gathered the use of structured and semi-structured questionnaires (N-76). The quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS version 15.0. The study revealed that virtually, all teachers in early childhood education centres have no professional early childhood education qualifications. Consequently, Nigeria must do more to learn from best practices elsewhere, especially in the West when it comes to early childhood education, if national education is to move towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Keywords: Education; Policy analysis; Redesign; Early childhood; professionalism; Competencies. 

 

 

38.
Ololube, N. P.; Egbezor, D. E.; & Kpolovie, P. J. (2008).
Education policies and teacher education programs: meeting the millennium development goals.
Journal of Teacher Education for Sustainability. Institute of Sustainable Education. Daugavpils University, Latvia.
http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jtes.2008.9.issue--1/v10099-009-0016-3/v10099-009-0016-3.xml   ISSN 1691-4147. (9), 21-34.

Abstract:

This paper explores the present situation regarding the education policies and teacher education programs in Nigeria in light of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) cited in the 2000 United Nations Millennium Declaration. The MDGs declaration helped awaken nations to the need for structural features that empower education policy makers and planners in creating effective educational systems. A survey was used to gather data from teachers and school administrators in Nigeria. The data suggested that both teachers and school administrators are discontented with the lethargic policies and implementation of programs in meeting global standards. In particular, the empirical data could be useful for education policymakers, planners, administrators, and researchers who need information that might help them to improve their activities and deal with the controversial issues.

Keywords: Education policies; Teacher education programs; Sustainable development; MDGs; Nigeria. 

 

39.

Kpolovie, P. J. and Iderima E. C. (2016).
Learners’ readiness for xMOOCs: Inequity in Nigeria.
European Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology. 4(3), 16-46. 
http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Learners----readiness-for-xMOOCS-Inequity-in-Nigeria.pdf

ABSTRACT:

Learners’ readiness for xMOOCs, a variant of MOOCs, mode of teaching-leaning interaction by four categories of university students in Nigeria (Conventional, National Open University of Nigerian, Open Distance learners, and Postgraduate learners) was investigated for possible inequity; using comparative ex post facto research design. Disproportional stratified random sampling was employed to draw a sample of 1200 students for the study. Data were collected with a highly valid (0.721 to 0.891) and reliable (0.832 to 0.880) instrument, dubbed xMOOCs Readiness Indicators. Results demonstrated overwhelming preponderance of Postgraduates’ incomparable superiority over other students across all the eight factors of readiness for xMOOCs (study skills, motivation, self-direction, computer skills, Internet skills, communication skills, self-efficacy, and ICT facilities ownership). There is inequity in Nigeria in terms of university students’ readiness for xMOOCs. While xMOOCs can and should successfully be used for postgraduate programs in Nigeria as the learners are suitably ready for it; the three categories of undergraduate learners’ readiness for xMOOCs demand radical improvement before this swiftly revolutionary educational approach can be adopted optimally fruitfully in the country. 

Keywords: MOOCs, xMOOCs, Readiness for xMOOCs, Factor of Readiness, Postgraduate Learners,  Undergraduate Learners, Inequity in Nigeria, NOUN, Open Distance Learners, Study Skills, Computer Skills, Internet skills, Motivation.

 

40.
Kpolovie, P. J. and Emekene, C. O. (2016).
Item Response Theory validation of Advanced Progressive Matrices in Nigeria.
British Journal of Psychology Research. 4(1), 1-32.
http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Item-Response-Theory-Validation-of-Advanced-Progressive-Matrices-in-Nigeria1.pdf

ABSTRACT:

Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) is a leading global non-verbal mental ability test for identification of individuals with clear thinking skills who can handle rigorous study programmes and cope with complexity and ambiguity of the contemporary workplace. The test is popularly used in America, Europe and Asia but has never been validated for use in Nigeria. A validation sample of 2100 in Nigeria was randomly drawn for this study. Triangulation research design, adopting Item Response Theory (IRT), guided this validation of APM. Results revealed that all items of the test yield favourable statistics under 3-Parameter Logistic IRT Model with regards to discrimination, difficulty and guessing. Item Response Function showed preponderance of APM’s reliability (0.948) and construct cum concurrent validity (0.701) with Culture Fair Intelligence Test (CFIT). X-Calibre analysis confirmed suitable difficulty indexes (-2.595 to 2.133 b parameter) of APM. The APM is biasfree and very suitable for use in Nigeria. 

KEYWORDS:

Advanced Progressive Matrices, Item Response Theory, X-Calibre, Test Bias, 3-Parameter Logistic Model, CFIT, Nigeria. 

 

41.
Ololube, N. P., Agbor, C. N.; and Kpolovie, P. J. (2016).
Effective communication processes: The responsibility of University Management for enhanced organizational justice (OJ).
In: N. P. Ololube (Ed.). Handbook of Research on Organizational Justice and Culture in Higher Education Institutions. Pennsylvania, USA: Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global). ISBN 9781466698505 (Hardcover); ISBN 9781466698512 (E-book). 
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/effective-communication-processes/150372  

ABSTRACT

This chapter assessed the impact of effective communication on Organizational Justice (OJ) in the university system. Internet search revealed that there no empirical studies on the impact of effective communication on OJ in general and in university system in particular. This ground-breaking research is intended to expand our understanding and proves to be a useful addition to the theme of this study. Communication is a characteristic common to all organizations. It is permanent, in that it is always happening, and yet it can happen so slowly that it is rarely ever noticed. On the other hand, certain communication processes, type and style have been forceful enough to draw immediate changes in organizations. To this end, quantitative assessment design was employed and questionnaire was used to measure effective communication processes and the three parts of OJ as it applies to the university system. Lecturers from four public universities responded to a questionnaire that employed a seven-point Likert-type scales. The study found that effective communication processes has positive impact on OJ. Lecturers perceived that their production and service output are not proportionate because of the unfair treatment as a result of the ineffective communication processes.

 

42.
Kpolovie, P. J. (2016b). Intelligence and academic achievement: A longitudinal survey. International Journal of Recent Scientific Research. 7(5), 11423-11439. http://www.recentscientific.com/sites/default/files/5415.pdf

Abstract

With longitudinal survey design of survey research method, this study investigated the complex relationships between intelligence and academic achievement in Mathematics and English Language over a period of four years in Nigeria.  A random sample of 637 Junior Secondary III students, aged 14 years, was drawn and followed till the end of their Senior Secondary III at the age of 17. Their Mathematics and English Language academic achievement were validly measured with Junior Secondary Certificate Examination (JSCE) scores and Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (SSCE) scores. Their IQ was validly and reliably measured with Culture Fair Intelligence Test that has been validated and standardized for use in Nigeria. Data were collected during the students’ 2011/2012 JSCE and 2014/2015 SSCE. The IQ and JSCE as well as SSCE scores were subjected to partial correlation analysis at 0.05 alpha, using SPSS Version 22. Results showed statistically significant relationship between IQ and Mathematics achievement (0.499 and 0.495) when English Language is partialled out; and between IQ and English Language achievement (0.411 and 0.346) when Mathematics is partialled out; respectively across the junior and senior secondary levels of schooling. Results, among others, further indicated overwhelming evidence of stability of intelligence (0.702) with the four-year time interval in super corroboration of fluid and crystalized theory of intelligence. Coefficient of partial determination unveiled that IQ accounts for 24.90% to 24.50% of the variance in Mathematics achievement, and16.89% to 11.97% of the variance in English Language achievement. 

 

43.
Kpolovie, P. J. (2016a). Single-subject research method: The needed simplification. British Journal of Education. 4(6), 68-95.  http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Kpolovie-Peter-James.pdf

Abstract:

Research, the scientific quest for knowledge discovery and dissemination, is done in accordance with specific research methods. Using documental analysis research method and a randomly drawn sample of 1557 from a population of 46,376 lecturers, results showed that single-subject research is the least adopted method in Nigeria; probably because it has the greatest dearth of readily available information. Single-subject research method is however very appropriate for establishment of cause-and-effect relationships between variables. It is a special experimental methodological approach for investigation of the effects of intervention measures on an individual’s clinical behavior; using the very subject as his own control by changing the intervention treatment conditions presented to him and carefully assessing via repeated measurements, the impact of the changes on the subject as he exhibits certain new behavior a number of times. This paper has provided elaborate information on five single-subject designs (A→B→A→B, multiple-baseline, interaction, alternating-treatment, and changing-criterion); and four single-subject data analysis techniques (visual analysis, therapeutic criterion study, interrupted time-series statistics, and statistical analysis) to fill the existing knowledge gap.

 

44.
Kpolovie, P. J. (2016). Excellent Research Methods. Indiana, USA: Partridge Publishing. https://www.amazon.com/Excellent-Research-Methods-Peter-Kpolovie/dp/1482824973

Back cover

This book is absolutely for everyone who is truly interested in identifying and solving an important problem in human life. It has marshaled the entire step-by-step procedures for arriving at empirical solutions to any chosen problem. In virtually every research situation everywhere, for everyone in almost all spheres of human endeavor, at least some of the research methods and designs in this book will work perfectly well. There are no limits to what one can accomplish in knowledge discovery by mastering and correctly applying the research methods thoroughly articulated robustly in this book. Excellent Research Methods serves as a most satisfactory answer to the ever fresh and extremely important question on the minds of numerous persons that beyond introduction, what is research? It guides to ensure that research works are able to completely meet the noble global goal of research, which is problem resolution. Virtually, all pertinent information on research methods, in the best sense of it, is exhaustively presented in the book. Grab a copy, read it voraciously with undying passion to know, resolute determination to apply, and total commitment to execute research and be reckoned among the great individuals with enormous indelible extraordinary contributions to knowledge advancement. 

 

45.

Kpolovie, P. J. and Emekene, C. O. (2016b). Psychometric Advent of Advanced Progressive Matrices – Smart Version (APM-SV) for use in Nigeria. European Journal of Statistics and Probability. 4(3), 20-60. ISSN 2055-0154(Print), ISSN 2055-0162(Online). http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Psychometric-Advent-of-Advanced-Progressive-Matrices-–-Smart-Version-Apm-Sv-For-Use-in-Nigeria.pdf

 

 ABSTRACT

The Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices (APM) test is a leading global nonverbal measure of mental ability, helping to identify individuals with advanced observation and clear thinking skills who can handle rigorous study programmes as well as the complexity and ambiguity of the modern workplace. APM scale is largely employed by researchers and practitioners in the field of psychometrics, education, medicine and the social sciences. A sample of 3100 participants in Nigeria was randomly drawn to answer nine research questions. Triangulation research design, adopting item response theory (IRT) guided the study. The study developed an abridged form of the APM dubbed Advanced Progressive Matrices-Smart Version (APM-SV). Results revealed that all 15 items of the APM-SV test yield favourable statistics under 3-Parameter Logistic IRT Model with regards to item discrimination, difficulty and guessing. Item Response Function showed preponderance of APM-SV’s reliability of 0.92. The APM-SV showed perfect fit, is bias-free and very suitable for use in Nigeria. APM-SV scale strongly and positively correlated well with other measures of fluid ability such as the APM scale itself, CFIT, Digit Span scale, and Bennett Mechanical Comprehension Test (BMCT).

 

 

46.

Kpolovie, P. J. and Iderima, E. C. (2016b). Readiness for MOOCs – learners’ inequity in Nigeria. EPRA International Journal of Economic and Business Review. 4(7), 5-25  http://eprawisdom.com/jpanel/upload/articles/845pm1.KPOLOVIE,%20Peter%20James%20&%20IDERIMA,%20E.%20Christian.pdf

 

ABSTRACT

This research investigated readiness for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in Nigeria. MOOCs comprises cMOOCs and xMOOCs; but it was very quickly found that there is no platform based in Nigeria for the former, so the latter that is in the country is empirically examined in this work in great detail. Learners’ readiness for xMOOCs, a variant of MOOCs, mode of teaching-leaning interaction by four categories of university students in Nigeria (Conventional, National Open University of Nigerian, Open Distance learners, and Postgraduate learners) was investigated for possible inequity; using comparative ex post facto research design. Disproportional stratified random sampling was employed to draw a sample of 1200 students for the study. Data were collected with a highly valid (0.721 to 0.891) and reliable (0.832 to 0.880) instrument, dubbed xMOOCs Readiness Indicators. Results demonstrated overwhelming preponderance of Postgraduates’ incomparable superiority over other students across all the eight factors of readiness for xMOOCs (study skills, motivation, self-direction, computer skills, Internet skills, communication skills, self-efficacy, and ICT facilities ownership). There is inequity in Nigeria in terms of university students’ readiness for xMOOCs. While xMOOCs can and should successfully be used for postgraduate programs in Nigeria as the learners are suitably ready for it; the three categories of undergraduate learners’ readiness for xMOOCs demand radical improvement before this swiftly revolutionary educational approach can be adopted optimally fruitfully in the country.

 

47.

Kpolovie, P. J. and Sado, A. A. (2016). CSR for conflict resolution in the Niger Delta oil and gas industry. British Journal of Environmental Sciences. 4(5), 1-53.

http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/CSR-for-Conflict-Resolution-in-Niger-Delta-Oil-and-Gas-Industry.pdf

 

ABSTRACT:

An ethnographic research method that allows for a blend of aspects of qualitative and quantitative investigations was adopted in this study to establish whether both the oil prospecting companies and their host communities have the same view that mutual coexistence between the two parties is very feasible and relatively cheaper via excellent CSR practices by the oil companies. CSR, an acronym that stands for Corporate Social Responsibility, is the persistent commitment by a business organization to ethically behave to contribute maximally to the economic and environmental advancement of the quality of life of its workforce and the society, particularly the host communities. It was hypothesized that excellent CSR practice by the oil companies might be a potent solution to the violent crisis that has unfortunately characterized the relationship between oil prospecting companies and their host, the oil producing communities in the Niger Delta. The effectiveness of seven indicators of CSR as perceived by the oil corporations and the oil-producing areas in the resolution of the brutal conflicts in the Niger Delta were empirically investigated. A large sample of 2,487 was drawn by proportional stratified random sampling technique from the host communities and oil companies for the study. Results showed an overwhelming discrepancy between oil companies’ staff and oil producing areas indigenes for each of the seven CSR indicators. While host communities absolutely or strongly favored adoption of CSR as a viable strategy for ending the crisis and ensuring ultimate peace in the Niger Delta; the staff of oil prospecting companies held a diametrically opposite view. It is therefore recommended very strongly that oil producing companies in the Niger Delta should accord primary attention to excellent CSR practices to guarantee mutual peaceful coexistence and optimum oil production in the Niger Delta Region.  

 

48.

Kpolovie, P. J. and Awusaku, O. K. (2016). ICT adoption attitude of lecturers. European Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology. 4(5), 9-57.

http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/ICT-Adoption-Attitude-of-Lecturers.pdf

ABSTRACT:

With ex-post facto research method, this study investigated the attitude of lecturers towards the adoption of Information and Communication Technology, abbreviated as ICT, in teaching and research in federal and state-owned universities in Nigeria. Four research questions and null hypotheses were respectively, answered and tested. A stratified sample of 400 lecturers (251 males and 149 females) was randomly drawn from one federal university and one state university. A factor analyzed 55 items instrument with high construct validity and three factor loadings was used for data collection. The reliability of the instrument, using the Cronbach alpha method, showed reliability coefficients of 0.67, 0.62, and 0.51 for attitude, competence, and accessibility factor loadings, respectively. Data analysis was done with the use of independent samples t-test and One-way ANOVA for testing the hypotheses. Results revealed that gender and area of specialization have no significant difference in the attitude of lecturers’ towards ICT adoption in teaching and research. On years of experience, moderately and less experienced lecturers are more competent in the use of ICTs than their highly experienced counterparts. ICT facilities are significantly more accessible the Federal university (University of Port Harcourt) than the State university (Rivers State University of Science and Technology). University management should motivate and encourage lecturers to participate in ICT training programs, lecturers especially highly experienced should be well motivated to develop their ICT competence.  KEYWORDS: Attitude, ICT, Gender, Years of experience, Area of specialization, ICT competence, and ICT access; Adoption of ICT, Attitude, Lecturers, Federal universities, State universities, Information and Communication Technology. 

 

49.

Kpolovie, P. J, Oshodi, P. O, and Iwuchukwu, H. CONTINENTAL INEQUITIES IN LIFE EXPECTANCY. European Journal of Biology and Medical Science Research. Vol.4, No.6, pp.30-47, December 2016.

http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Continental-Inequities-In-Life-Expectancy.pdf

ABSTRACT: 
This investigation adopted documentary analysis research design that guarantees authenticity, accuracy, validity and reliability to ascertain the life expectancy of countries and continents in the world; and to determine whether statistically significant continental inequities exist in the globe. Six continents and 216 countries were randomly sampled from a population of 7 continents and 253 countries world-over for this study.
Descriptive Statistics, Analysis of Variance and Bonferroni Multiple Comparisons with IBM SPSS were used for data analysis to test tenability of the null hypothesis at 0.05 alpha. Results showed that a significant continental inequities in life expectancy exist between continents in the world. Life expectancy in Africa is significantly lower than in each of all the other continents. There is an overwhelming preponderance of the statistical evidence that life expectancy in Europe is higher than in Oceania and Asia which are in turn better significantly than in Africa. Europe, North America, and South America do not differ significantly in their life expectancy. Aptly, how long are humans expected to live on each continent? The world has a mean of 72.24 life expectancy; the means for Africa is 61.14; Asia is 73.26; Europe is 78.99; North America is 76.23; South America is 74.40; and Oceania is 74.24. Every necessary measure should be taken to radically improve life expectancy in each continent, particularly in Africa.

 

50.

Kpolovie, P. J., Ewansiha, S., Esara, M. (2017). CONTINENTAL COMPARISON OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX (HDI). International Journal of Humanities Social Sciences and Education (IJHSSE). 4(1), 9-27. https://www.arcjournals.org/pdfs/ijhsse/v4-i1/2.pdf

ABSTRACT:

Documentary analysis research design was used in this study to reliably, validly, authentically, and accurately ascertain the Human Development Index (HDI) of countries for comparison of continents in the world as objectively measured by the United Nations Development Programme via the World Wide Web. The investigation examined the three HDI indicators (long and healthy life, access to knowledge and quality education, and a decent standard of living) obtained from the different countries in the world and compared the HDI of the seven continents worldwide. A proportionally stratified sample of 182 was drawn from the 253 countries across continents in the globe for the study. Analysis of Variance and Bonferroni Post Hoc Test were adopted to test the null hypothesis of no significant continental difference in Human Development Index at 0.05 alpha. Results showed that Africa has HDI mean of 0.536 which is significantly lower than that for each of the other continents in the world (Asia 0.714, Europe 0.845, North America 0.733, South America 0.738, and Oceania 0.693), and the global average of 0.697. Europe has the highest HDI with significant overwhelming preponderance over the world average and greater than that of all other continents in the universe. Asia, North America, South America, and Oceania do not differ significantly in their HDI. Each African country should do everything possible to guarantee the three HDI indicators for all its citizenry to radically improve the Human Development Index of Africa. Every country in each continent is charged to fervently improve its Human Development Index by passionately striving at and actually attaining the peak of HDI for the world to essentially arrive at the ideal Human Development Index of 1.00.   

 

51.

Kpolovie, P. J. & Lale, N. E. S. (2017). GLOBALIZATION AND ADAPTATION OF UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM WITH LMSs IN THE CHANGING WORLD. European Journal of Computer Science and Information Technology. 5(2), 28-89.  http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Globalization-and-Adaptation-of-University-Curriculum-to-LMSS-with-the-Changing-World.pdf 

ABSTRACT:

Methodological approaches and efforts towards attainment of excellence in higher education, as the most powerful instrument for social and economic advancement, are undergoing major changes technologically and otherwise. For the university to play a leading role in the ever-changing world of globalization, internationalization, and digitalization; the university curriculum must necessarily be adapted to suit the Revolutionary Information Age that we live in. Learning Management Systems (LMSs) are used all over Higher Education Institutions (HEI) in Europe, North America, South America, Asia, Oceania, and most countries in Africa for the purpose. The need to acquire, know, understand, and actually use LMS in the Third World countries as in the Developed World has arisen and is rapidly increasing aggressively in today’s ever-changing globalized digital knowledge economy. Unfortunately however, LMS is not yet in use in any of the universities in Nigeria as a function of lack of information about how LMSs are being used, where and how to acquire LMSs, and which LMSs are the most adopted elsewhere in the world. This research aimed at, and provided the requisite information for universities to easily acquire, develop and use LMSs for effective delivery of higher education to meet the internationalization and globalization needs of the Revolutionary Information Age.

 

52.

Kpolovie, P. J. & Onoshagbegbe, E. S. (2017). RESEARCH PRODUCTIVITY: h-INDEX AND i10-INDEX OF ACADEMICS IN NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES. International Journal of Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods. Vol.5, No.2, pp.62-123.

http://www.eajournals.org/wp-content/uploads/Research-Productivity-h-Index-and-I10-Index-of-Academics-in-Nigerian-Universities.pdf

 

ABSTRACT:

This study examined the research productivity of academic staff of Nigerian universities. Research productivity was measured using Google Scholar h-index and i10-index. Effect-to-Cause Causal-Comparative Ex-Post Facto Design was adopted. A sample of 1073, composed of 713, 266 and 94 staff of Federal, State and Private Universities with School of Graduate Studies in the South-South geopolitical region. Six research questions and null hypotheses were respectively answered and tested. One-way ANOVA and independent samples t-test were used to test the null hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. Findings showed no statistically significant difference between the research productivity of Federal, State and Private Universities: (h-index, F (2, 1072) = 2.853, P>0.05; and i10-index, F (2, 1072) = 2.288, P>0.05). The findings interestingly revealed statistically significant difference in h-index: F (8, 1064) = 40.666, P < 0.05; and i10-index: F (8, 1064) = 22.321, P < 0.05 between the nine faculties (areas of specialization). The research productivity of staff in Faculties of Health Science, Natural/Applied Sciences, and Agriculture is overwhelmingly (significantly) greater than those of staff in Faculties of Law, Humanities, Education, Social Sciences, Management Sciences, and Engineering. The study exposed that female academics are less productive in research in comparison with their male counterparts. It recommended frequent adoption of the two productivity measures (h-index and i10-index) as well as numerous publication of research works online to boost research productivity of staff in the universities.

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