Research Publications

E Bob-Yellowe

Traumatic Death from Rival Gang Violence in Rivers State, Nigeria

D Seleye-Fubara                     E Bob-Yellowe                   2011

Abstract

A prospective autopsy study in Rivers State, Nigeria, was undertaken to evaluate the patterns of death as a result of rival gang clashes and to highlight the menace of rival gang violence.

Between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2003 medico-legally autopsied bodies in Rivers State, where death was the result of gang violence, were studied after being served with the coroner's form. In all cases, standard autopsy procedures were adopted and reports were issued.

A total of 58 bodies were autopsied for the study. Three (5.2%) were females and 55 (94.8%) were males, giving a female to male ratio of 1:18.3. The age group of 10-29 years recorded the highest frequency of death (65.6%) with a peak in the age group 20-29 years (39.7%). Gang violence and politically motivated mob action were the most common precipitating factors (60.3% and 20.7% respectively). Firearms (41.4%) was the most common method applied for the killing. Death was more common in the rural areas of Rivers State.

Gang clashes, volatile political rallies, illegal drug peddling and illegal oil bunkering should be banned and stringent laws be passed. Such laws should also cover gun handling and should be enforced.

http://msl.sagepub.com/content/45/4/340.short

 

 

Industrial Accidental Deaths in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria: A study of 32 autopsies in Port Harcourt

D SELEYE-FUBARA

E BOB-YELLOWE               2006

Abstract

Accidents in the oil industry in the Niger delta region of Nigera raise concerns about safety measures and the management of industrial sites.

A total of 32 autopsies were performed after coroners' inquest forms were served on the authors by the State, which serve as consent and request. Standard procedures were adopted in all the cases and the reports were appropriately issued.

Death from industrial accidents accounted for 2.5% and 6.1% of total autopsies and accidental death autopsies respectively. The youngest victim was a 19 year old male while the oldest was a 55 year old male. The age group 30-39 years was the most vulnerable. There was a male dominance; (male:female ratio = 9.7:1). The commonest accidents in their order of frequency were: falling from a height, explosion/fire, motor vehicle accidents and falling objects. Multiple injuries, head and neck trauma and drowning were the commonest cause of death at autopsy. Accidental deaths were commoner in the small-scale industries (81%) than in the large-scale industries (19%).

This is the first time such a study has been carried out locally. The proportion of accidental deaths in the small scale industries relative to that of the large ones may be attributed to the poor enforcement of safety measures in the smaller industries

http://msl.sagepub.com/content/46/4/342.short

 

 

Granulomatous osteomyelitis: A review of 13 cases in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

D Seleye-Fubara, EN Etebu, E Bob-Yellowe                          2011

Background: Osteomyelitis is usually caused by many infectious agents but granulomatous osteomyelitis is rare in this setting requiring adequate research into the pattern of the few diagnosed cases. Aim: To study the frequency and pattern of granulomatous osteomyelitis. Design and Setting: A retrospective study in Port Harcourt, Nigeria (from 1 st January 1990 to 31 st December 2004). Method: The tissues were fixed in 10% formalsaline and decalcified with concentrated Nitric or sulfuric acid, and processed and embedded in paraffin wax. The tissues were then sectioned, mounted on glass slide and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) stains. In some cases special stains (Ziehl-Neelsen and Grocotte's) were used to demonstrate the acid fast bacilli (AFB) and the fungal elements respectively. Results: There were 13 specimens of which 8 (61.5%) were from males and 5(38.5%) in females giving a sex ratio of 1.6:1. Eight (61.5%) cases occurred in patients under the age of 30 years. The highest frequency of four (30.8%) occurred in patients aged 10 years and below. The youngest was a 3-year-old male while the oldest was a 62-year-old male. Tuberculous (Tb) osteomyelitis accounted for twelve (92.3%) of the cases while histoplasmosis accounted for one (7.1%). One of our patients was HIV positive. The common sites of predilection were the hip joint n-4 (30.8%) and the vertebral column n = 3 (23.1%). Conclusion: Granulomatous osteomyelitis is very uncommon in this environment. Though many organisms maybe associated, only TB and histoplasmosis were seen in this study.

 

http://www.smjonline.org/article.asp?issn=1118-8561;year=2011;volume=14;issue=1;spage=11;epage=15;aulast=Seleye-Fubara;type=0

 

 

Title:         PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL SYNDROME IN PORT HARCOURT, NIGER-DELTA REGION OF NIGERIA JANUARY 1999-DECEMBER 2003

 

Authors:   

Nwaneri, D.U
Stanley, P.C
Bob-Yellowe, E

 

Issue Date:      2005

 

Abstract:   Background: This was a hospital-based study on the prevalence of alcohol withdrawal syndrome amongst patients admitted in the medical, surgical and psychiatric wards of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria; between January 1999 and December 2003. The hospital was one of the specialized centers in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria. The patients were admitted not necessarily for alcohol related symptoms. Methods: Alcohol abusers were identified through the use of a 4-item questionnaire CAGE; and the patients with alcohol withdrawal syndrome were identified based on the DSMIV Criteria. Results: Amongst the 2,405 patients admitted in the study period of ages 16-54 years, 403 (17%) met the criteria for alcohol abuse, out of which 31 (1%) had alcohol withdrawal syndrome. They were 25 males (81%) and 6 females (19%). For those who had alcohol withdrawal syndrome, the mean duration of alcohol intake was 22 years. The mean quantity of alcohol taken was 49 units per week. Sixteen percent of the patients with withdrawal symptoms manifested within 24 hours of admission, and another 23% up to 48 hours. Ten percent developed withdrawal seizures. In conclusion, high prevalence of alcohol abuse and alcohol withdrawal syndrome was seen among patients admitted to the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The patients were typically from polygamous family, single, had no formal education or dropped out from school, many with occupational difficulties and forensic history.

 

URI:         http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/404

 

http://68.169.61.47:8090/jspui/handle/123456789/404

 

 

Pathology of firearm mortalities in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria: a study of 136 consecutive autopsies

  1. D. Seleye-Fubara

E.N. Etebu

E. Bob-Yellowe                                  2009

Abstract

A prospective autopsy study of firearms-related death was carried out by the authors in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the pattern, frequency, and anatomical sites of wounds, also the cause of death and the age and sex distribution of victims. The autopsies were performed after being served with the coroner's inquest forms. In all cases standard autopsy procedures were adopted and reports issued.

A total of 136 consecutive firearm deaths were autopsied. There were 122 (89.7%) males and 14 (10.3%) females, giving a male to female ratio of 8.7:1. The highest number of deaths, 95 (69.8%), occurred in the age group of 10–39 years with a peak of 51 (37.5%) deaths at 20–29 years. In 112 (82.4%) cases death occurred from homicidal gunshot wounds. The commonest targets of gunshot wounds were the head, 58 (42.6%); multiple anatomical sites, 30 (22.1%); chest, 16 (11.8%); abdomen, 11 (8.1%) and neck, 10 (7.4%). Haemorrhagic shock was the cause of death in 131 (96.3%) cases.

Significant causes of traumatic death in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria are gunshot wounds and associated complications. Stringent laws on illegal firearms handling should be passed and enforced by the government to reduce the frequency of such deaths.

http://msl.sagepub.com/content/49/1/51.short

 

 

Soft tissue sarcomas in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria (a referral hospital's study).

Seleye-Fubara D , Nwosu SO , Yellowe BE2005

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Soft tissue sarcomas are rare tumours in this environment. Recently, an upsurge in frequency was noticed that called for attention. The aim of this study is to study soft tissue sarcomas based on age, sex of patients, tumour sites and histologic types.

METHODOLOGY: A 14 year retrospective study in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) Port Harcourt. Histological slides previously processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin stains (H & E) were reviewed and re-evaluated. Special stains were also used for proper diagnosis of some tumours. The tumours were classified based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification of soft tissue tumours.

RESULTS: Only 66 soft tissue sarcomas were used for this study which accounted for 2.8% of the total malignancies diagnosed during the period under review. The youngest was a 3 year old girl while the eldest was a 76 year old female. A total of 38 and 28 tumours were diagnosed in males and females respectively, giving a sex ratio of 1.4:1. Rhabdomyosarcoma was most frequent (39.4%) while the least was leiomyosarcoma (1.5%). These tumours are more frequent in the under 20 years (22.7%) and least in 70 years and above (7.6%). The lower limb was most affected (36.4%) while the least was the retroperitoneum (6.1%). The commonest predilection sites vary with different classes of these group malignancies.

CONCLUSION: Soft tissue malignancies are globally uncommon but they constituted an integral part of malignant tumours causing serious morbidity and mortality in this environment. The recent upsurge noticed necessitated the need for regional studies in Nigeria in order to come up with a national epidemiologic data of these malignancies.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/16083244

 

 

Surgical mortality in the emergency room

  • Aniekan Udoh Ekere 
  • , Bob Evans Yellowe                          2004
  • , Steve Umune

Abstract

We reviewed retrospectively 125 surgical deaths in the accident and emergency department of University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, a major health facility in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, between April 2000 and March 2003. Data were extracted from the casualty records. The male-to-female ratio was 2.8:1. The mean age was 36.5+16.9, with 84 being between 20 and 49 years. Road traffic deaths constituted the highest toll (n=52). Head injury was the commonest primary cause of death (n=37), while cardio respiratory arrest (n=59) was the commonest secondary cause of death. The majority of patients died within 24 h. Surgical deaths constitute a significant load in emergency room deaths. Most of these are from road trauma, and efforts at prevention are advocated.

 

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00264-004-0548-z

 

 

Pattern and management approach of diabetic foot disease in a developing country.

Ekere AU , Yellowe BE , Dodiyi-Manuel A

Orthopaedics and Trauma Unit, Departmen

[2005

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrine illness in our environment. Diabetic foot gangrene is its commonest surgical complication and is a health burden in Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The aim of the study was to highlight the demography, bacterial incidence, time frame to development of diabetic foot, reaction to ablative surgery and the use of San Antonio wound classification system forthe treatment decision. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 46 diabetic feet in 41 diabetics over a 5 year period, January 1999 to December 2003, using the San Antonio classification system. The case notes of all patients seen in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital were included in the study.

RESULTS: There were 32 males and 9 females with a male female ratio of 3.6:1. The age range was 34 to 90 years with a mean of 56 +/- 12 years. The mean duration between diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and development of foot disease was 13 +/- 5 years. Twenty four patients (59.5%) with stages A or B irrespective of the grade had a chance of limb salvage using appropriate antibiotic, serial wound debridement, regular dressing and skin grafting where necessary. Of the 24, 3 absconded, 5 died and 16 healed and were discharged. The remaining 17 patients (40.5%) were stages C and D and were offered ablative surgery irrespective of the grade. Nine discharged against medical advice, 5 died and 3 were discharged in good condition.

CONCLUSION: This is a disease of the older population. Delay in accepting ablative surgery affects prognosis. Outcome in management of diabetic foot disease can be improved by education, early presentation, funding for establishment of specialized diabetic foot clinics and early decisive definitive management.

http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/16350695

 

 

Prevalence of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in Port Harcourt, Niger-Delta region of Nigeria

 

PC Stanley      DU Nwaneri               E Bob-Yellowe           2005

 

Abstract

Background: This was a hospital-based study on the prevalence of alcohol withdrawal syndrome amongst patients admitted in the medical, surgical and psychiatric wards of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria; between January 1999 and December 2003. The hospital was one of the specialized centers in the Niger-Delta region of Nigeria. The patients were admitted not necessarily for alcohol related symptoms. Methods: Alcohol abusers were identified through the use of a 4-item questionnaire CAGE; and the patients with alcohol withdrawal syndrome were identified based on the DSM IV Criteria. Results: Amongst the 2,405 patients admitted in the study period of ages 16-54 years, 403 (17%) met the criteria for alcohol abuse, out of which 31 (1%) had alcohol withdrawal syndrome. They were 25 males (81%) and 6 females (19%). For those who had alcohol withdrawal syndrome, the mean duration of alcohol intake was 22 years. The mean quantity of alcohol taken was 49 units per week. Sixteen percent of the patients with withdrawal symptoms manifested within 24 hours of admission, and another 23% up to 48 hours. Ten percent developed withdrawal seizures. In conclusion, high prevalence of alcohol abuse and alcohol withdrawal syndrome was seen among patients admitted to the University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The patients were typically from polygamous family, single, had no formal education or dropped out from school, many with occupational difficulties and forensic history.

 

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Damian_Nwaneri3/publication/277664886_Prevalence_of_alcohol_withdrawal_syndrome_in_Port_Harcourt_Niger-Delta_region_of_Nigeria/links/556f4aee08aeccd777413468.pdf

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